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Full text of "Allerlei"


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L. P. Hollander & Co 



BOSTON : Boylston St. and Park Sq. 
NEW YORK: 290 Fifth Ave. 



NEWPORT: Casino Building. 
PARIS OFFICE: 21 Rue Bergere. 



Order Departments : 
Costumes, 

Riding Habits, 

Coats, 

Millinery. 



\ Ready-Made Departments : 

Capes, Coats, 

Travelling Wraps, 

Graduating Dresses, 
Outing and Party Dresses, 

Trimmed Hats. 



GLOVES. — Our Special Makes. 

LADIES 9 UNDERWEAR. 

New England Agents for FASSO CORSETS. 



Fttte Sress (uoods tit Sxctttstve &estgtts« 



Special Discount of 10 per cent in all Ready-Made Departments to Students and 

Instructors of Lasell Seminary. 

Our House is Celebrated for its Distinctive Taste and Leading Ideas on Fashions, 

(0 



Gifts 



Twenty-two of the most Complete Departments with Up-to-date Goods 
for Weddings, Birthdays, Anniversaries. 

[)ianqOT)d Ocpartnqei^t. Solitaire, Twin, and Circlet Diamond Rings. 

$25.00, $50.00, $75.00, $100 00. 

Stationery Department. High-Class Stationery from the best makers. 

En^faVin^. Card, Society and Wedding Work a Specialty. 



A. STOWELL & CO., 24 Winter St., Boston. 



R. H. WHITE & CO. 

504 to 536 Washington Street, BOSTON, MASS, 



WHEN YOU ARE IN NEED 

Of Silks, Velvets, Dress Goods, Ladies' Garments, Furs, Millinery, Hosiery and Underwear, Linings, Gloves, 

Laces, Parasols, Handkerchiefs, Cotton Underwear, Ribbons, Dress Trimmings, Small Wares, Jewelry, 

Toilet Goods, Linens, Cottons, Flannels, Blankets, Boots and Shoes, Silverware, China, 

Crockery, Glassware, Cut Glass, Bric-a-brac, Upholstery Goods, Carpets, Rugs, 

Kitchen Furnishing Goods, etc., etc., 

G-IVES TT!S -A. CAXjU! 

Should you be unable to visit our store, drop us a line and we will send you SAMPLES. 

(2) 



he ® ® ostor? ® and ® j?lbai->g ® fp. ^. 



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Has the best through car service from New 



England to the commercial centres of the 



West; and is the only line running through 



cars via 







New York Central & Hudson River R. R., 



Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry., 



Big Four Route (C. C. C. & St L Ry.), and 



Michigan Central R. R, 



(Passing in full view of Niagara Palls). 



Trains Vestibuled. 
Complete Through 
Dining Car Service. 




IVING Tourists the benefit of a through service without 
requiring the prepayment of a sufficient sum to cover all 
expenses contingent on a trip of several weeks' or months' duration. 
Passage and berth tickets only being required, all other expenses 
while in transit or sojourning in the West are left discretionary with the traveller, who is thus enabled 
to go and come at pleasure, patronizing such hotels and lines as may best suit his convenience. 

(3) 



EDWARD E. BABB & CO 



DEALiERS Ifi 




SCHOOH BOO^S and 

SCHOOL! SUPPLIES 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 




25 Arch Street 



BOSTON, MASS. 



HOTEL ^ BELLEVUE, 

Beacon Street, Boston* 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 



A quiet hotel with a cafe of rare ex- 
cellence. Located on Beacon Hill, near the 
State House, and convenient to all the large 
stores and places of amusement. 



^^ 



J. W. SMITH, 

Proprietor. 



ESPECIALLY ADAPTED TO LADIES WITHOUT ESCORT. 



(4) 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 



Tfie CIo^jiiI Afetv Store 



Washington and Kneeland Streets* 



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Situated in the corner of our elegant new store, between the two main entrances, is our 
Confectionery Department, which is one of the largest and the handsomest of any in this 
city. This is fully stocked with 

Fresh Confectionery 

of all kinds of the finest French Candies, including Nougatines, Bavarian, St. Nicholas, 

Montevideo, Nanon, Operas, Chocolate-Covered Caramels, Opera Caramels, 

Crystallized French Fruits, etc. Also the more common kinds. 

ALL OF WHICH ARE STRICTLY AIM} ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

and sold at moderate prices. 

— wm- 



The Finest Grocery Store in America* 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. = BOSTON. 

(5) 



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WHITNEY'S 



Temple Place t Boston* 



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Summer Waists, Worsteds and Yarns. 



LADIES' 

Handkerchiefs, Pin Cushions. 



s.^* aJ* s. 1 ^ s.* 



Embroidery Cloths with Silk and Linen Flosses. 
We Stamp FREE All Goods purchased of us. 

(6) 



Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 




I QiX^P^^J attention to the designing and execution of 
| SO CIETY BADGES, PINS an d DEVICE S, both in 
I Gold and Silver. Designs furnished and estimates sub- 
| mitted, on application, free of charge. Also* Stationery 
| for Class Day and other uses. Prizes in Silver, Gold 
| and Bronze, suitable for Class presentation. <m j^t *m 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO., Entire Building, cor. Tremont and West Sts. 






The (^onnegtigut IY^utual: * * 
* ♦ * Iife Insurance (% 



Assets, $62,759,765.95 



Surplus, $7,096,256.43 



THE CONNECTICUT MUTUAL stands by i'self and occupies a thoroughly enviable position in life insurance. It was never 
before so strong or so deserving of confidence as it is to-day and never had more of the public confidence than it has now. 

It offers plain life insurance, as protection to the family, and tries to make it attractive simply by making it perfect to that end 
and by keeping its cost down to the lowest possible point. It tries to realize the ideal results of a legitimate business; and it seeks 
to attract to its membership only those who want only such results, and do nut want a speculation on their family's protection. 

The conservative course of the company has brought to it a conservative constituency, and these people are the best risks, for 
they are people who take care of themselves; and they are the best members, for they are stayers. 



JACOB L. GREENE, President. 
JOHN M. TAYLOR, Vice-President. 



EDWARD M. BUNCE, Secretary. 
DANIEL H. WELLS, Actuary. 



GEORGE E. WILLIAMS 



Gen'l Agt., 53 Devonshire St., Boston, flass. 

(7) 



Q A. JENKINS & CO, j dt oft 

LADIES' HATTERS. 



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SPECIAL AND UNIQUE STYLES IN 

Dress Hats and English Turbans* 

OUR & & j* 

English Walking and Sailor Hats 

Are Fine in Quality a* Practical in Style, 
Made of Selected English Braids. 

e^* 5*5* e<?* c«5* 

SOLE BOSTON AGENTS FOR 

Connelly's New York Hats* 



407 Washington Street, 



<* ^ BOSTON. 

(8) 



VOLUME VI. 



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LIBRARY 



AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

1896. 







1896 





r 

«- NoOghfoK^^ n s HOT deception/. 
L*CT an else be yorgoTie^ 

F 

I •'ThtflPiririrwas gwerf. 




Z^s^v 




EDWARD LASELL, 

Professor of Chemistry , Williams College, 
FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNOALE, MASS. 




CHARLES C. BRAGDON, 
Present Principal, 



Dedication. 



TO those for whom we '11 pine and sigh, 
For whom our love will never die, 
Who from these halls so soon will hie, 
We dedicate our Allerlei. 
Oh, Ninety-six, so brave, so true, 
Our labors, dear, have not been few, 
Yet not one toil do we now rue, 
In dedicating this to you. 



Another class we fail to find 
That 's quite your equal in our mind, 
With goodly traits of every kind 
(Consider this by Juniors sign'd). 
So dedicate to thee we must, 
This little work of love and trust, 
Don't push it by with scornful thrust, 
Nor leave for years to lie in dust ; 



But keep it as a relic dear 
Of school-girl days so full of cheer, 
And when you leave us shed no tear ; 
We '11 not forget thee, never fear, 
But hold thee ever, you shall see, 
So close within our memory, 
That never from us can you flee, 
But of our heart shall keep the key. 
(14) 





Grace Washburn, 
Gertrude Clarke, 
Assistant Manager. 



Emeline Carlisle, 
Edi (or- in - Ch irf. 
Lena Evans, Nora Burroughs, 

Assis(an( Edi(ors. 

(•7) 



Myrtle Davis, 

Anna Warner, 



Business Manager. 




EDITH BLAIR, J. P. 1 

Home in Wyoming, 0. 
Formerly attended Bar- 
tholomew 's English 
and Classical School. 
Entered Lasell in Feb- 
ruary, 1894. 

•' Those dark eyes so dark 
and so deep." 



NORA BURROUGHS, A. E. A. :i 

Edwardsville, 111. 
Edwardsville High 
School. 
September, 1894. 

'Jo do my duty in 
that state of life un- 
to which it shall 
please God to call 





FRANCES RUND- 
LETT BOWMAN', 
C. C. B. 2 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Council Bluffs High 
School. 
September, 1894. 

The choicest goods come 
in small packages." 




EMEL1NE HOWE CARLISLE, E.C.A. 4 

Passaic, N. J. 
Passaic High School. 
September, 1894. 

" Deep, subtle rails in truth are master 
spirits in the world." 




GERTRUDE AGNES CLARKE, J. S s 

Northampton, Mass. 
Burnham School. 
September, 1894. 

" Oh, blest with temper whose unclouded 
ray 
Can make to-morrow cheerful as to-day." 




1VAH MARIE DAVIS, 
C. W. 7 

Topeka, Kan. 
" College of the Sisters 
of Bethany," in To- 
peka. 
September, 1895. 

" / have no other but a 
woman's reason: 
I think it so, because I 
think it so." 




ELIZABETH WES- 
TON DAVIS, M.I. 6 

Florence, Italy. 
Riverside School 
^Riverside, Mass.). 
September, 1888, and 
again in December, 
1896. 

" Her voice was ever soft, 
Gentle, and low, — an 
excellent thing in 
woman." 




MYRTLE MAE 

DAVIS, A. E. A. s 

Topeka, Kan. 
"College of the 
Sisters of Beth- 
any." 
September, 1895. 

"Eloquence shall 
throne thee wit'i 
archangels." 



1 Junior President. 

2 Corporal Company B. 

a Assistant Editor " Allerlei." 



4 Editor-in-Chief of the " Allerlei." 

5 Junior Secretary. 

e Member from Italy. 

(19) 



7 Class Wit. 

s Assislant Editor of the 



Allerlei. 




LENA DRYDEN 
EVANS, A. E. A. 9 

Fort Worth, Texas. 
Dana Hall, Welltsley. 
September, 1894. 

" Wisdo7>i is humble that 
ike knows no more " 




GERTRUDE A. JONES, 
J. T. 13 

Kansas City. Mo. 
Kansas City High 

School. 
September, 1894. 

'•But to see her was to 
love her." 




NELLIE JAMERSON 
FEAGLES, N. R. M. 10 

Haskins, Ohio. 
llaskins High School. 
September, 1895. 

" J here studiously let me 

sit, 
A nil hold hig/i converse 

with the mighty dead." 



t!% 



LENA MARSTON JOSSELYN, C. P. 14 

Manchester, N. II. 
Manchester High School. 
September, 1S95. 

" A dimple is a tiny thing to dream of and regret, 
But how that dimple twinkled — I never can forgets 




EMMA COLLIER GRANT, J. V. P." 

Summit, N. J. 

Summit Collegiate Institute. 

September, 1894. 

'• Her lofty step. Her bearing high."' 




EDITH HOWE, S. P. A.'- 

Passaic, N. J. 
Passaic High School. 
September, 1894. 

" Silence more musical is than any speech.' 




j LOUISE WOLCOTT RICHARDS, T. IV 5 

Weymouth, Mass. 

Weymouth North High School. 

September. 1895. 

" Brushing with hasty steps the dews away, 
To jneel the sun upon the upland lawn." 



9 Assistant Editor of the "Allerlei." 

10 Non- Resident Member. 

11 Junior Vice-President. 



12 Secretary Publishing Association. 
1 ' Junior Treasurer. 



(20, 



14 Class Photographer. 

15 Tennis Player. 





4 


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ZELLA VINA ROBIN- 
SON, J. C. A. 16 

Columbus, Ohio. 
Ohio State University. 
January, 1896. 

" All nature is but art.'' 




ANNIE MABEL 
WESTON, A. C. P. 19 

Manchester, N. H. 
Abbot Academy, An- 
dover. 
September, 189;. 

" Of manners gentle, of 
affections mild" 




LUCIA SHUMWAY, 
L. P. 17 

Polo, 111. 

Northwestern Univer- 
sity, Evanston, 111. 
September, 1895. 

" In small proportion we 
just beauties see, 
And in short measures 
lives may perfect be." 




GRACE PHILBR1CK WASHBURN, A. E. A. 18 

Melrose, Mass. 
Melrose High School. 
September, 1894. 

" For if she will, she will, you may depend on 'I; 
And if she won't, she won't, so there's an end on V." 




ANNA GERTRUDE WHIT- 
MAN, J. C. B. 21 

Wollaston Heights, Mass. 
Quincy High School. 
September, 1893. 

"Love hath led her in the net." 




ANNA PARKER WARNER, B. M. A. 20 

Washington, D. C. 

Metzger Institute, Carlisle, Pa. 

September, 1893. 

" Songs of that high art, 
Which, as winds do in the pine, 
Find an answer in each heart." 




ANNIE SPOTTSWOOD YOUNG, J. C. P. 22 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Girls' Latin School, Baltimore. 

September, 1895. 

" Who says in verse what others say in prose.'' 



16 Junior Class Artist. 

17 Lasellia President. 



1S Assistant Editor of the "Allerlei." 



19 Assistant Class Photographer. 

20 Business Manager of the " Allerlei." 

(21) 



21 Junior Class Bride. 

22 Junior Class Poet. 



P>oard of Tm^tees. 



Rev. Wm. R. Clark, D. D. 

Rev. C. Parkhurst, D. D. 

Prof. Jules Luquiens. 
C. C. Bragdon. 

Mrs. C. C. Bragdon. 



PacQltY- 



CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M. A., 

Principal. 
Constitution of United States and 
Political Economy. 

CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

Assistant Principal. 
English Literature and History. 

JULIA EVANS, M.A., 
Preceptress. 
Manners, Dress. 

GEORGE M. STEELE, D. D., 
Pastor. 

Bible, Ethics, Psychology. 

WILLIAM J. ROLFE, A. M., 

Shakespeare. 



HERBERT L. RICH, Ph. B., 

Natural Sciences. 

ANNIE P. CALL, 



Nerve Training. 



Major GEORGE H. BENYON, 
Military Drill. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS, 

Piano-forte, Theory, Harmony. 

J. WALTER DAVIS, 

Voice Culture, Chorus Singing. 

KATE E. PLUMMER, 
Organ. 

S. E. GOLDSTEIN, 
Violin. 



LILIAN M. PACKARD, Ph. B., 

Mathematics. 



LOUISE PUTNAM, 

Guitar, Mandolin. 



(24) 



HENRY ORNE RYDER, 



Drawing, Painting. 



ADELINE L. ADAMS, 
History of Art. 



M. GRACE PINKHAM, M. A., 

Latin, Greek. 



MARY P. WTTHERBEE, 



English . 



JEANNE LE ROYER, 
French. 



BLANCHE BEMIS, 

ANNA S. McDUFFEE, 

Assistants in Gymnasium 

ANNA BARROWS, 
Cooking, Demonstrations and Practice. 



ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 
Book-keeping, Penmanship. 



WILLIAM D. BRIDGE, D. D., 

Phonography. 

EMILY H. GENN, 

Typewriting. 



PAULA VON DER KALL, 
German. 



SUSAN TRUE, 



Dress-cutting. 



LILIAN H WEYENTS, 



Reading. 



MARY L. NUTT, 

Nurse. 



MARTHA E. RANSOM, 

Physical Culture and Swimming. 



MABEL COGSWELL, 

Assistant in Laboratory. 



U5) 



Preparatory. 



Ella D. Brightman 



Myra L. Davis . 
Eva L. Ferris . 

Alice Martin, S. D. 
Ella M. Pollard 

Mary L. Sanders 

Ellen Stone 

Ida F. Trowbridge 



New Bedford, Mass. 

Weston, Mass. 

South Norwalk, Conn. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Ashland, N. H. . 

Southbridge, Mass. 

Chelsea, Mass. 

South Framingham, Mass. 



48 

53 
16 

37 
70 

48 

8 

76 



(29) 



I'm, ^~- •■ i 






Mm 

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Freeman Class. 



Motto : " Labor omnia vincet.' 



Class Colors : Dark Blue and White. Class Flower : Bride Rose. 



Katherine Mason 
Clarissa Hastings 
Nettie Ostrander 
Josephine Millikin 



President 
Vice-Presiden t. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



Names. 

Carol M. Case, S. D. 
Helen A. Dyer . 
Mildred M. Faxon, S. D. 
Nellie S. Frank, Lasellia 
Marie M. Grisvvold, Lasellia 
Martha W. Gunsaulus 
Clarissa Hastings 
Lucilla B. Knapp 
Ethel Lasell, S. D. . 
Katherine Mason, Lasellia 
Josephine Millikin 
Mattie Ostrander 
Elise E. Scott . 



Residences. 

Highland Park, Conn. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Canton, Ohio 
Columbus, Wis. 
Chicago, 111. . 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
New York City 
Boone, Iowa . 
Saco, Me. 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 



Rooms. 
26 

• 63 

9 
40 

Annex, 4 
8 

9 
Annex, 5 

• 58 
16 



(33; 



History of ft)e Class of '99 




HEN we were but Preparatories we looked with respect, not unmixed with envy, 
toward the Freshmen, who, though as scholars not so good as we, had yet "the 
full rights of citizens." Then we were not allowed to have our history recorded 
in that noble book, "The Allerlei," — a fact forever to be regretted by all Lasell 
girls ; but having since proved our ability not only to have, but also to write, a 
history worthy of being read by the great and good of all time, we are allowed the same privileges 
which so many Freshmen before us have enjoyed. 

Our importance as a class began at our first meeting, when we tried to solve that difficult 
problem placed before so many classes, — "Who shall hold the offices? What shall be the motto, 
the flower, and the class color?" Though we pride ourselves on our wisdom, we were obliged to 
adjourn without making the all-important selection of the class color; for we thought it best, before 
deciding, to send to a large establishment in a distant city for an assortment of ribbon which should 
suit all individual tastes. 

With all modesty I think it may be stated that we are noted throughout the school for our 
good scholarship. Especially is this true in the study of history. So many times has our honored 
teacher spoken of our carefully prepared lessons, — once even having depended upon the scholarly 
recitations of our illustrious class to awaken her from drowsiness caused by the poorly prepared 
lessons recited a few hours before, — that we feel more and more sure of the fact that in this 
especial study we are destined to outshine all other classes of Lasell. 

(34) 



In geometry, when by chance any two or more of us have at the same time a rush of ideas 
to the head, as to some possible way to solve the problem before the class, we try simultaneously, 
and without regard to who spoke first, or has a right to the floor, to prove the said proposition ; if 
none of the speakers is willing to leave her proof until the others are through talking, all continue 
to talk at the same time until Miss Packard declares that she cannot understand a word anyone 
says. This, however, only makes the recitation more exciting, and I think the Freshman Class very 
much enjoys the short periods spent in Room Six. 

If I may be permitted to say so, we surpass even the learned Seniors in the neatness of our 
compositions, which, in that particular, at least, meet with the expressed approval of Miss Witherbee. 

I am sure that no one will continue to wonder why the members of this class are always 
cheerful, and why they are so proud to belong to the Class of '99. 



(35) 



C3opl)OD)ore Class- 



Motto : " On a rien pour rien." 



Class Colors : Green and White. Class Flowers : iVIaiden Hair Fern and White Rose. 



Marie Wilson 



President. 



Names. 

Anna Ampt, S. D. . 
Clarissa Arnold 
Emma L. Aull, S. D. 
Martha A. Baker, Lasellia 
Ada Cadmus, S. D. . 
Kittiebel Chapman, Lasellia 
Ruth Crandell 
Sadie M. Farnsworth, S. D. 
Emma H. Goll, S. D. 
Edith T. Grant, S. D. . 
Edna M. Hancock, S. D. 
Luella Houghton 
Alice Kimball, Lasellia 
Ruth R. Kimball . 
Maud A. Mayo, Lasellia 
Ruth K. Merriam . 
Jennie Myrick, Lasellia . 
Marie Wilson, Lasellia 
Florence Wilder 



Residences. 

Cincinnati, O. 
Unadilla, N. Y. . 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Port Antonio, Jamaica 
Jersey City Heights, N. 
Elgin, 111. . 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Council Bluffs, la. . 
Chicago, 111. 
Summit, N. J. 
Philadelphia, Perm. 
Red Oak, la. 
Presque Isle, Me. . 
Clarinda, la. 
Foxcroft, Me. 
Meriden, Conn. . 
Yarmouthport, Mass 
New York, N. Y. . 
New York, N. Y. 
(39) 



J- 



Rooms. 
24 

3 2 
43 
67 
69 

36 

4i 
39 
43 
57 
14 
13 
2 3 
65 
2 3 
13 
38 
53 



Class History, '95. 




T is with no small misgivings that the historian attempts to write the history of the 

Class of '98. Not that it is a matter requiring such deft handling; quite the contrary, - 

for who could imagine a more matter-of-fact subject? But where there is so much 

j ^ax'j<?MM,nq^i to tell there is danger of damaging omissions. 

Our first year at Lasell was spent in brightening the lives of our teachers, as well as those 

of our classmates; for we have always been, as a class, possessed of wide and tender sympathies, 

and an eager desire to help those in distress. 

While a suggestion of fresh greenness yet hung around us, during the second year of our 

Lasell life, the members of our class, joined hand in hand, went stumbling together over planes 

and triangles, coming to grief over the location of the Capitoline Hill, the dimensions of the 

Coliseum, or the exact number of the rhetorical figures and who invented them, but never failing, 

in any single instance, to gain distinction, — of various kinds. Indeed, so proud of us were the 

" Powers that Be," that many of our number have at different times been asked to fill prominent 

places, such as the front seats in Chapel, or even those in the " English Room." But now, by 

the Freshman road well travelled, we have reached the alluring goal of Sophomore dignities, and 

one in heart, but with eighteen shining faces turned in eighteen different directions, lest we miss the 

sight of some one of our elders (or youngers), we greet you, with no thought of guile in our 

hearts, although, alas! we have been accused of "that Sophomore trick of wishing to be wicked." 

When those who had not absorbed quite all of the wisdom of the ages, and consequently 

knew not whether to be " Sophs " or Specials, had " dropped by the wayside," the surviving 

(40) 



warriors, ever equal to the task set them, like the Tenth Legion, plodded on to conquer the 
mysteries and to exhaust the possibilities of trignometry (likewise the patience of our instructor). 
The mysteries, we would say, are myriad and overwhelmingly startling, while the possibilities are 
still lingering in the region of minus infinity, waiting for the button to be pressed which shall 
enable them to cross over the limit into a region more positive. 

During our Sophomore year, then, we are making evident to all our remarkable abilities 
and rare qualities as students, and these will continue to become more and more apparent as 
the end of the year approaches. 

Our Class being so transcendently talented, it does not take a prophet to foretell that in 
the smiling future a laurel wreath awaits each of us. Included in our number are two or three 
musical prodigies, who, when the last note of their song has ceased to echo from the chapel 
walls, gain such applause as Patti or Melba might well be proud of (and probably never received). 
We have musicians, elocutionists, artists, ripe scholars in French and Latin, and writers destined 
to occupy thrones in the Kingdom of Letters. 

The talent of our Class is not matter of pride to New England alone, but to the glorious 
West, also; for have we not representatives from the "World's Fair" State, that State distinguished 
not only for the number of its representatives, but also for the quality of their endowments? 
Our president hails from the Empire State, and several of her classmates do the same. From 
New Jersey come to us a musician and a French scholar; and from the "Buckeye" State 
comes our artist, Tood. Our Quaker " Ted " comes from the " Centennial " State. Jamaica sends 
one of her daughters to the protection of the Stars and Stripes. Missouri and Iowa and several 
New England States are represented. 

Now is the work of the historian done, and for the account of '98's future triumphs the 
eager public must wait until they have been gained. What the future has in store for us we 
can only guess, but — "Meantime we live in hope." 

(40 



Jan tor Class 



Class Colors : Red and White. 



Motto: " Loyal en tout." 

Honorary Member. 
William Dean Howells. 



Class Flower : Red Carnation. 



Edith Blair 
Emeline Carlisle 
Gertrude A. Clarke 
Gertrude A. Jones 

Names. 

Edith Blair, Lasellia . 
Frances Bowman 
Nora J. Burroughs, Lasellia 
Emeline H. Carlisle, Lasellia 
Gertrude A. Clarke, S. D. 
Elizabeth W. Davis . 
Ivah M Davis, S. D. 
Myrtle M. Davis, S. D . 
Lena D. Evans, S D. 
Nellie J. Feagles 
Emma C. Grant, S. D. 
Edith Howe, Lasellia 
Gertrude A. Jones, Lasellia 
Lena M. Josselyn, S. D. . 
Louise W. Richards, S. D. 
Zella V. Robinson, S. D. . 
Lucia Shumway, Lasellia . 
Anna Warner, S. D. 
Grace P. Washburn, Lasellia 
Annie M. Weston, Lasellia 
Anna G. Whitman, Lasellia 
Annie S. Young, S. D. 



Residences. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Council Bluffs, la. 
Edwardsville, 111. 
Passaic, N.J. 
Northampton, Mass 
Florence, Italy 
Topeka, Kan. 
Topeka, Kan. 
Fort Worth, Tex. 
Toledo, Ohio 
Summit, N.J. 
Passaic, N. J. • 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Weymouth, Mass. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Polo, 111. 

Washington, D. C. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Wollaston, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

(45) 



President. 
Vice-Presiden t. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



Rooms. 

34 
4i 
40 
60 
10 

Annex, n 
19 
19 
57 

43 
60 

63 

28 

30 
30 

59 

31 
22 

22 

4 

52 



Comenfarii de Oassico Janiorio. 



It 




>*usai5tsKS>jxa 



LIBER I. 

LL Lasell is divided into four parts. Of these the Seniors occupy one, the Freshmen 
another, and the Sophomores a third. However, the fourth, and by far the most important 
part, is occupied by those who in the language of the school are called Juniors and in ours 
are rightly named " The People." All these tribes differ greatly among themselves in 
manners and knowledge. The River of Learning, neither very wide nor very deep, flows 
between the Juniors and the Seniors. This river is easily crossed by means of the bridge of Study, and 
many battles have been fought between these two powerful tribes, but peace reigns now and forever 
between them. 

LIBER II. 
C. Bragdonus and T. Facultas, being consuls, the time approached when, according to the 
customs, the Juniors should send forth their annual report which is commonly known as " Allerlei." 
However, after they were settled in winter quarters at Lasell, frequent rumors came to them concerning 
the determination of the consuls to prevent the publication of their report. "The People" were much 
discouraged by this rumor, but being called together by their leader, E. Blara, all determined to try to 
turn the consuls from their terrible purpose. So it happened that, ambassadors having been sent to the 
consuls, a treaty was formed by which the Juniors were allowed to send forth their Allerlei. 

LIBER III. 

Now, as Spring approached, it happened that " The People " sent messengers through all the 
neighboring towns to announce that any one who would journey to the town of Lasell, on the evening of 

(46) 



the Nones of March, would behold and hear there many great and wondrous things. Multitudes of 
people heard the summons and heeded it. So it happened at the appointed time the Lasell forum was 
filled with many men from all the neighboring tribes. The other divisions of the tribes of Lasell came 
to see their sisters, and the Classicus Seniorias appeared arrayed in their majestic new togas for the first 
time, thus doing great honors to their Junior sisters. After the great and grand play was over the 
Sophomoric tribe presented to " The People" a basket filled with the most beautiful flowers of the field. 
No one was sorrowful at having obeyed the summons of "The People," but all with one voice praised 
the noble Juniors whose name and fame will be handed clown to posterity from generation to generation, 
many years and one. 

LIBER IV, 

So the days have passed on, and now the Juniors begin to look forward to the time when they 
shall be out of Winter quarters and on the battlefield for the Summer. One more year only can they 
spend in the Lasellian camp, and then they will have become so wise and so great that they will be able 
to go forth among all the tribes of the world and fight their own battles as they are now being taught to 
do. Much must they accomplish in this next year, in order that they may please the consuls and gain 
for themselves the much longed-for scrolls in the month of Junius in the year 1897. 



(47) 







*L 







(48) 



¥//// ' 



«S£ 




5enior Class. 



Class Colors : Green and Gold. 



Motto: "Deeds, not words," 



Honorary Member. 



Class Flower : La France Rose. 




1) 



Blanche L. Kelley 
Cara A. Sawin 
Katherine Pennell 

Names. 

Ella F. Ampt, S D. 
Martha E. Avery . 
Bess Bailey, Lasellia 
M. Louise Barnes . 
Isabel Bronson, S. D. 
Katherine J. Buck, S. 
Alice W. Clarke 
Mary B. Cruikshank, S. D. 
Anna F. Cushing, Lasellia 
Josephine B. Chandler, Lasellia 
Virginia L. Ellison, Lasellia 
Grace P. Englehart 
Annie J. Hackett 
Bessie S. Hayward . 
Susan B. Hayward . 
Lestra M. Hibberd, S. D. 
Helen Holman, S. D. 
Louise P. Hubbard, S. 
Blanche L. Kelley, S. D. 
Ethel D. Loud, Lasellia 
Katherine Pennell, S. D. 
Florence A. Ray, S. 1). 
Cara A. Sawin, Lasellia 
Margie M. Schuberth, S. 
Julia. Tulleys, Lasellia 
Ella W. Wilson, Lasellia 



D. 



D. 



Residences. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Plymouth, Mass. 
Marion, Ind. 
Dover, N. H. 
Ottawa, Can. 
Denver, Col. 
Uxbridge, Mass. 
Hannibal, Mo. 
Foxcroft, Me. 
Maiden, Mass 
Kansas City, Mo. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
Dubuque, la. 
Temple, N. H. 
Uxbridge, Mass. 
Richmond, Ind. 
Chicago, 111. 
Wheeling, W. Va 
Worcester, Mass. 
Everett, Mass. 
Atchison, Kan. 
Ottawa, Can. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Council Bluffs, la 
New York, N. Y. 

(50 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



Rooms. 

24 

49 

12 

47 
29 
28 
44 

65 

7 
27 

5 
41 
76 

44 
39 
64 

27 

25 
62 

7 
29 

4 

25 

62 

38 



Class of '96. 




XCE upon a time there lived six and twenty maidens, at whose birth it had been fore- 
told that they should live peaceful lives at home until the great King of the Land of 
Learning should send forth a decree bidding them to his palace. The parents were 
warned that they should rear their daughters in readiness to obey this command. 

So these twenty-six little girls played and romped like all other little girls ; and 
the years went by. Childhood was left behind ; Maidenhood beckoned. Then there came, one day, 
from the King, a messenger, who told them that the time was drawing near when they would be 
summoned to leave their homes and parents, and all that was dear to them, and journey to the 
King's Court. 

At first the maidens were very sorrowful, but soon they began to wonder about their new 
life, and they were not sorry when at last the decree was issued, and they set out for the Land of 
Learning. 

The King of this country had summoned not only our twenty-six maidens, but also many 
others, from far and near, and they gathered from all parts of the world to the King's court. But 
his Majesty was especially pleased with our maidens, and after testing their spirits and abilities by 
three years of unremitting labor, for such was the custom in that land, he appointed them to special 
places of honor in his palace ; and he called them Seniors. 

At the Court of Learning every one was given certain tasks to do, and those of the Seniors 

were especially difficult. One duty that troubled some of them most was the task performed with 

the aid of the Barrows. This Barrows was used to convey bread and other dietetic necessaries to 

he needy, and to the lot of the Seniors it fell to assist in due succession in distributing these offer- 

(52) 



ings. Many a time the bread proved to be a heavy load, and then the footsteps would grow slow, 
and the head would droop. But when the burden was light the halting steps would quicken, and 
the drooping head be raised. 

A few of the maidens had difficult hills to ascend in their daily rounds, their only aid being 
that of sweet music, to which, if they timed their steps, their ascent proved comparatively easy. 
Being, beyond all other maidens, wise, they complied with this condition, availed themselves of the 
assistance thus to be obtained, and soon became so accustomed to this work that it seemed to lose 
all difficulty for them, several even distinguishing themselves by the excellence with which they 
accomplished these Alpine feats. 

In the Land of Learning, rank, as understood by those not native born, seems to be sadly 
topsy-turvy, and, odd as it may seem, next in rank to the King himself was the Carpenter, and 
many a time had this magnate prevented the overthrow of the palace and the destruction of the 
Seniors in the ruin, for, alas ! mutiny and rebellion were things not unknown in that fair land, and 
the Seniors were especially the objects of jealousy to the other servitors of the King. 

At last, however, after many hard and weary days, when too often the spirits flagged and 
the mind seemed dazed, yet, also, after many days that were bright and happy, the Seniors ended 
their term of service and time of training in the Court of the King of the Land of Learning, and 
with hearts at once glad and sad, turned their steps from his palace into the wide world, where 
they, in their turn, were to sow the seeds of knowledge, and of kindness, and of lofty living. 



(53) 



Appendix to Senior OciSS History. 



E. Ampt 
M. Avery . 
B. Bailey . 
L. Barnes 
I. Bronson 
K. Bucknum 
J. Chandler 
A. Clarke 
M. Cruikshank 
A. Cushing 
V. Ellison 
G. Englehart 

A. H AC RETT 

B. Hay ward 

S. Hayward 

L. HlBBERD 

H. Holman 
L. Hubbard 

B. Kelley. 

E. Loud 

K. Pennell 

F. Ray 

C. Sawin . 
M. Schuberth 

J. TULLEYS 

E. Wilson 



Entirely Artless. 
Marvelously Attractive. 
Bluffs Bravely. 
Laughing Bother. 
Implicitly Brumal. 
Kisses Beautifully. 
Jolly Chatter. 
Always Calling. 
Marvelously Crammed. 
Awfully Cute. 
Very Elegant. 
Generally Erubescent. 
Always Happy. 
Bonny Hearted. 
Smiling Healthfully. 
Loves Hymns. 
Horribly Homesick. 
Looking Heavenward. 
Bashful Kid. 
Extremely Lank. 
Kind o' Pretty. 
Fantastic Ramrod. 
Cooing Sweetheart. 
Misses Somebody. 
Juvenile Titan. 
Ever Wilful. 



(54) 



© 



ft; 






$f>CCJ AC$. 





Names. 

Alice L. Abrams 

Julia A. T. Aldrich, S. D 

Mabel E. Barber, S. D. . 

Mary T. Blair, Lasellia . 

Nellie Briggs . 

Sarah A Carman, Lasellia 

Lucie A. Carter 

Laura Chapman, Lasellia 

Margaret B. Cobb, Lasellia 

Bernice L Cogswell 

Eva Cole, Lasellia . 

Eda A. Cooper, Lasellia . 

Harriet A. Crane 

Bessie H. Dana 

Beulah De Forest . 

Helen De Long, S. D. 

Mary H. De Ridder, Lasellia 

Elizabeth Edson, S. D. . 

May W. Emery 

Grace J. McLellan, S. D. 

Ethel J. Garey 

Bertha Fisher . 

Edna Friedman 

Alice M. Fuller 

Rena M. Goodwin . 

Olive Healey, S. D. 

Clara M. Heath 



Residences. 

Auburndale, Mass. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Roxbury, Mass. . 
Terre Haute, Ind. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
Highlandville, Mass. 
Elgin, 111. . 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Killingly, Conn. . 
Bloomington, 111 . 
Chicago, 111. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Glen Falls, N. Y. 
Saratoga, N. Y. . 
Washington, D. C. 
Waltham, Mass. . 
Newton Centre, Mass. 
Newton Centre, Mass. 
Mattapan, Mass. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Biddeford, Me. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Denver, Col 

(55) 



Annex 



Rooms. 

IO 

33 

52 
56 

49 

20 

7 
36 
54 



15 
37 

5i 
6 



Annex, 



5 

>5 
11 

58 

66 

8 



Names. 










Residences. 










Rooms. 


Lillian Hockman ....... Hagerstown, Md. . . . . . . n 


Maria Holcomb 










New Bedford, Mass. 










56 


Caroline M. Kendall 










Leominster, Mass. 










20 


Clara G. Krome, Lasellia 










Edwardsville, 111. . 










59 


Harriet K. Lawrence, S. D. 










Ypsilanti, Mich. . 










52 


L. Musette D. Lovell, S. D. 










Boston, Mass. 










42 


J. Cecile Lovell, S. D. . 










Boston, Mass. 










42 


Katherine McDowell, S. D. 










Medina, 0. . 










3f 


H. Mary McDonald 










Dubuque, la. 








Annex, 4 


Helen Y. McDonald 










Dubuque, la. 








Annex, 4 


Edith F. Moulton . 










Salem, Mass. 








48 


Mabel D. Muth, S. D. . 










Cincinnati, 0. 








64 


Harriet R. Ollinger 










Milton, Fla. 








70 


Lucile M. Parish, Lasellia 










Chicago, 111. 








5i 


Georgia E. Peck 










Minneapolis, Minn. 








6 


Edith M. Perry 










Leominster, Mass. 








• 


May L. Peters, S D. 










Syracuse, N. Y. . 








12 


Katherine H. Pierce, Lasellia 










New Haven, Conn 








Annex, 8 


Mary Pierson, Lasellia 










Terre Haute, Ind. 








54 


Ethel J. Pillsbury, Lasellia 










Tilton, N. H. . 








Annex, 5 


Ellen D. Sanborn, S. D. . 










Milwaukee, Wis. . 








57 


Ellen M. Siedentopf, Lasellia 










Council Bluffs, la. 








4 


Beulah L. Smith 










Rondout, N. Y. . 


. 






18 


May C. Stanley 










Pawtucket, R. I. 








18 


Christine Stephens, Lasellia 










Brooklyn, N. Y. . 








1 


Annie R. Stuart 










Newark, N. Y. . 








14 


Gertrude Taggart 










Indianapolis, Ind. 








35 


Lilian Taggart 










Indianapolis, Ind. 








35 


Helen T. Turner 










Auburndale, Mass. 








. 


Edna L. Warfield . ... 










Woonsocket, R. I. 








9 


Irene V. Wellington 










North Oxford, Mass. 








• • 56 


Nellie S. Wilson . 










Nahant, Mass. 








26 


Marguerite Whong . 










Foo Chow, China 








> 





(56) 



3n QHemorianu 



Mrs. LILA COLEMAN HART, 

Died, August, 1895. 



MRS. ELLEN HUNT CURTIS, 

Died, September, 1895. 



HARRIETTE PERRY FITCH, 

Died, November, 1895. 



LUCY TOWNSEND RICHMOND, 

Died, March, 1896. 



a. D. Officers. 



President. 
KATE PENNELL. 



Secretary. 
LENA EVANS. 



SADIE FARNSWORTH. 



ADA CADMUS. 



Vice-President. 
KATHERINE BUCKNUM. 



Executive Committee. 
LENA JOSSELYN. 

Critic. 
ALICE MARTIN. 

Ushers. 



Treasurer. 
ANNA WARNER. 



EDNA HANCOCK. 



CECILIA LOVELL. 



(59) 



MEMBERS OF S. D. SOCIETY. 



Julia Aldrich. 

Anna Ampt. 

Ella Ampt. 

Emma Aull. 

Mabel Barber. 

Isabel Bronson. 
Katherine Bucknum. 

Ada Cadmus. 

Carol Case. 

Gertrude Clarke. 

Mary Cruikshank. 

Ivah Davis. 
Myrtle Davis. 

Helen De Long. 

Elizabeth Edson. 

Lena Evans. 

Sadie Farnsworth. 

Mildred Faxon. 
Emma Goll. 

Edith Grant. 

Emma Grant. 

Edna Hancock. 

Olive Healey. 



Clara Heath. 

Helen Holman. 

Lestra Hibberd. 

Louise Hubbard. 

Lena Josselyn. 

Blanche Kelley. 
Ethel Lasell. 

Harriet Lawrence. 

Cecilia Lovell. 

Musette Lovell. 

Alice Martin. 

Katherine McDowell. 
Grace McClellan. 

May Muth. 

Kate Pennell. 

May Peters. 

Florence Ray. 

Louise Richards. 
Zella Robinson. 

Ellen Sanborn. 

Margie Schuberth. 

Anna Warner. 

Annie Young. 



(61) 



I^asellia Gab. 



President. 
LUCIA SHUMWAY. 

Vice-President. 
MARY DE RIDDER. 



Secretary. 
CHRISTINE STEVENS 



Business Manager. 
KITTIEBEL CHAPMAN. 



Critic. 
MARIE GRISWOLD. 



ALICE KIMBALL. 



Executive Committee. 
JENNIE MYRICK. 



ETHEL PILLSBURY. 



EDA COOPER. 



Guards. 
KATHERINE MASON. 



ANNA WESTON. 



Honorary Members. 



(63) 



MEMBERS OF LASELLIA CLUB. 



Bess Bailey. 

Martha Baker. 
Edith Blair. 

Nora Burroughs. 

Emeline Carlisle. 

Kittiebell Chapman. 
Josephine Chandler. 
Margaret Cobb 

Eva Cole. 

Eda Cooper. 

Anna Cushing. 

Mary De Ridder. 
Virginia Ellison. 
Nellie Frank. 

Marie Griswold. 
Edith Howe. 

Gertrude Jones. 
Alice Kimball. 



Ethel Loud. 

Katherine Mason. 
Maude Mayo. 

Jennie Myrick. 
Lucile Parish. 

Katherine Pierce. 
May Pierson. 

Ethel Pillsbury. 
Cara Sawin. 

Lucia Shumway. 

Ellen Siedentopf. 

Christine Stevens. 
Julia Tulleys. 

Grace Washburn. 

Anna Weston. 

Anna Whitman. 

Ella Wilson. 

Marie Wilson. 



(65) 




Lasell Canoe Ctob. 



President, Emma H. Goll. 

Martha Baker. 
Josephine B. Chandler. 
Kittiebel Chapman. 
Lena Dryden Evans. 
Eva L. Ferris. 
Emma H. Goll. 
Marie Griswold. 
Lestra M. Hibberd. 
Gertrude A. Jones. 



Captain, Miss M. E. RANSOM. 

Secretary and Treasurer, E. Willard Wilson. 

Blanche L. Kelley. 

Harriet K. Lawrence. 

Mame McDonald. 

Nellie M. McDonald. 

Lucile Mae Parish. 

Zella V. Robinson. 

Margie M. Schuberth. 

Edna Warfield. 

E. Willard Wilson. 
(66) 



5f)a^espeare Class ■ 



Lecturer 

Julia Aldrich. 
Ella Ampt. 

Martha Avery. 
Bess Bailey. 

Mabel Barber. 
Louise Barnes. 
Edith Blair. 

Frances Bowman. 
Isabel Bronson. 

Katherine Bucknum. 
Nora Burroughs. 

Emeline Carlisle. 

Josephine Chandler. 
Alice Clarke. 

Gertrude Clarke. 
Bernice Cogswell. 
Margaret Cobb. 

Mary Cruikshank. 
Anne Gushing. 

Elizabeth Davis. 



Ivah Davis. 

Myrtle Davis. 

Helen De Long. 

Elizabeth Edson. 

Virginia Ellison. 
Grace Englehart. 
Lena Evans. 

Alice Fuller. 

Emma Grant. 

Edna Hancock. 
Bess Hay ward. 

Susan Hay ward. 
Olive Healey. 

Lestra Hibberd. 
Helen Holman. 
Edith Howe. 

Louise Hubbard. 
Gertrude Jones. 
Lena Josselyn. 

Blanche Kelley. 



Dr. W. J. Rolfe. 

Flora Ketch am. 
Ethel Loud. 

Katherine McDowell. 
May Muth. 

Harriet Ollinger. 
Katherine Pennell. 
Florence Ray. 

Louise Richards. 
Ellen Sanborn. 
Cara Sawin. 
Margie Schuberth. 
Gertrude Taggart. 
Lilian Taggart. 
Julia Tulleys. 

Anna Warner. 
Grace Washburn. 
Anna Weston. 
Anna Whitman. 
Ella Wilson. 
Nellie Wilson. 
Annie Young. 



(68) 



Pianoforte ©oartets. 



i. 

MAUD CASE. 

SADIE FARNSWORTH. 
EDITH HOWE. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS. 



II. 
MARTHA AVERY. 

MARGARET COBB. 

ETHEL PILLSBURY. 

ELLA WILSON. 



III. 

MARTHA BAKER. 

ANNA CUSHING. 

LESTRA HIBBERD 

JOSEPH A. HILLS. 



IV. 

MAY EMERY. 

EDNA WARFIELD. 

MARIE WILSON. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS. 



(69) 




Orphean Ctob. 



Clarissa Arnold. 
Emma Aull. 

Martha Baker. 
Mabel Barber. 

Nora Burroughs. 
Ada Cadmus. 
Emeline Carlisle. 
Maude Case. 

Bernice Cogswell. 



Eda Cooper. 

Katherine Pierce. 

Elizabeth Edson. 
Nellie Feagles. 
Emma Goll. 

Rena Goodwin. 
Lillian Hockman. 
Marie Holcomb. 

Alice Kimball. 
Nellie Wilson. 
J. Walter Davis, Leader. 
Lestra Hibberd, Accompanist. 
(70) 



Blanche Kelley. 

Ellen Siedentopf. 
Georgia Peck. 
Kit Pennell. 

Christine Stevens. 
Anna Warner. 
Irene Wellington. 
Florence Wilder. 
Ella Wilson. 



Mandolin and (Mfar Club. 



Leader. 
ELLA W. WILSON. 



First Mandolins. 
LESTRA M. HIBBERD. 

EMMA H. GOLL. 

EDITH BLAIR. 



Second Mandolins. 

ADA CADMUS. 

HELEN HOLMAN. 
ANNIE WESTON. 



ELLA W. WILSON. 

ISABEL E. BRONSON. 

MARIE GRISWOLD. 



Guitars. 



CLARA KROME. 



GERTRUDE A. JONES. 
KATE S. PENNELL. 
MABEL BARBOUR. 



Violin. 

CECILIA LOVELL. 

(7U 




MM 

fjf 





Cooking Clares. 



Specials. 



Edith Blair. 

Eda Cooper. 

Alice Fuller. 

Isabel Bronson. 

Laura Chapman. 

Lestra Hibberd. 
Louise Hubbard. 



Third Year. 



Katherine Pennell. 

(72) 



Lilian Hockman. 
May Peters. 

Irene Wellington. 



Alice Kimball. 

Cara Savvin. 

Ella Wilson. 

Anna Whitman. 




•VOUXJdMCE XXI, 3STO. 6. 




CONTENTS. 



and Ex- 



Jng 



The mora 

A MountRi 

Some Books WortI 

Callers 

Queens ol To-day 

Etchings . 

The Laaell Reunion In Boston 



!Be of It 



Pao«. 

103 I Locals 



105 
106 
106 
108 
109 
109 
110 
111 



The Junior Entertainment 

Personals 

Passed Away 

The Priees 

Married . 

Address 

Grandmother's G» 

Exchanges 




"Lasell Leaves." 



" Dux Fern ina Facti.' 



Published monthly, during the School Year, by Lasell Publishing Association. 



FIRST TERM. 

Florence Ray, '96, President. 

Gertrude Clarke, '97, Vice-President. 
Maud Mayo, '98, Secretary. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Alice Clarke, '96. 

-Associate Editors. 

Emeline Carlisle, '97. Cara Sawin, '96. 

Anna Warner, '97. 

Local Eiiitor. Exchange Editor. 

May Muth. Martha Avery, '96 

Subscription Agent. Business Manager. 

Anna Cushing, '96. Isabel Bronson, '96. 

Auditor. 
Mr. H. L. Rich. 



SECOND TERM. 

Cara Sawin, '96, President. 

Helen De Long, Vice President. 

Bess Bailey, '96, Secretary. 



Editor-in- Chief. 
Alice Clarke, '96. 

Associate Editors. 

Louise Richards, '97. Gertrude Clarke, '97. 

Julia Aldrich. 

Local Editor. Exchange Editor. 

Annie Young, '97. Gertrude Taggart. 

Subscription Agent Business Manager. 

Sadie Farnsworth, '98. Nellie Wilson. 

Auditor. 
Ella Wilson, '96. 
THIRD TERM. 

Emeline Carlisle, '97, President 

Edith Howe, '97, Secretary. 



Anna Cushing, '96, Vice-President. 

Editor-in-Chief. 
Helen De Long. 

Associate Editors 
Florence Wilder. Anna Stewart 



Local Editor. 
Mary De Ridder. 



Exchange Editor 
Alice Fuller. 



Subscription Agent. 
Katherine Pierce, 



Business Manager 



Lucile Parish. 

Auditor. 
Ella Wilson, '96. 

Nellie Wilson. 



(74) 





Prop. J. V/alTcr Davis 
T^of. Joseph k- Hills 



Prop. Herbert L. Rich 

MademoiselU Jeanne U "Re 
•Mora. J. Burroughs 
LiUt'e Hochman 

•VluseiTe X). Lowell 





* •**«» MC« h<* 



JeanhCTTe Cecil* "a Love'l 



WeTTie OsTr^nder 

Miss iVUry T? WiTNfcrbce. * 



XSS^ 








^ k 



.-ALJE. 



Dre&s Catting. 



EMELINE CARLISLE. 



ALICE FULLER. 



ETHEL LASELL. 



ELLfi POLLARD. 



ANNIE STUART. 



IRENE WELLINGTON 



(76) 





Basdl Battalion. 



COMPANY A. 

Captain, Kate Pennell. Lieutenant, Emma H. Goll. 

Sergeants. Corporals. 

First, Alice W. Clarke Alice Kimball. 

Second, May D. Muth. Elise Scott. 

Third, Gertrude A. Jones. Anna Warner. 

COMPANY B. 

Captain, Josephine Chandler. Lieutenant, Julia Tulleys. 

Sergeants. Corporals. 

First, Mary B. Cruikshank. Sadie Farnsworth. 

Second, Ethel Loud. Julia Aldrich. 

Third, M. Louise Barnes. Frances Bowman. 

(77) 



Commencement Weefy 



JUNE 6-12, 1895. 



Commencement Concert 



Thursday Evening, June 6. 



Baccalaureate Sermon . Sunday, June 9. 



Class Night 
Senior Reception 



Dr. E. E. HOSS. 



Monday, June 10. 



Tuesday Evening, June 11. 



Commencement Exercises 



Wednesday, June r2. 



Commencement Address 



Alumnte Reception 



Dr. W. P. THIRKIELD. 



. Wednesday Afternoon. 



(78) 



Oass ftigf)t. 



JUNE 10, 1895. 



CLASS SONG 



Roll Call 
President's Address 
Class History . 
Guide to Life at Las ell 
Piano-forte Solo 
Lasell Leaves 



. ALICE ANDREESEN. 

MABEL CATHERINE TAYLOR. 

. FRANCE V. FAIRCHILD. 

. CAROLINE LADD STEEL. 

. ALICE ANDREESEN. 

. GRACE E. LOUD. 



Recitation, "The Hungry Man was Fed" (Richard Harding Davis), 

GRACE LOUISE ALLEN. 
Donations SARA A. BOND. 

Song of our Miseries; or, We Had to Complain. 



Mrs. Lincoln's Cook Book Revised 
Prophecy . . . . . 

Good Bye . 



. MABEL M. LUTES. 

SARA HAYDEN. 

MABEL W. SAWYER. 



Oration . 

Burning of Relics . 

Presentation . 



OUT-DOOR EXERCISES. 

. KATHERINE BELLE BRAGDON. 
DOROTHY M. MANNING. 

HELEN BILLINGS MORRIS. 

(79) 




* Love 'S Labors 




Lost 



FERDINAND, KING OF NAVARRE, 



BION, 



1 



LONGAVILLE, } 



Lords attending on King, 



DUMAIN, 



J 



BOYET, Lord attending on Princess, 
PRINCESS OF FRANCE, 



MARIA, ^ 

KATHERINE, j. 
ROSALINE, j 

MOTH, a Page, 



Ladies attending on Princess, 



Scene, Navarre. 



. Miss Kelley. 

f Miss Wilson. 

j Miss Chandler. 

I Miss Schuberth. 

Miss Ampt. 



Miss Sasvin. 



f Miss Ray. 

i 
■{ Miss Hibberd. 

i 

I Miss Holman. 



Miss Ellison. 



(80) 



Jantor Entertainment. 



MARCH 7, 1896. 



pyqmpciof/ pkd Qicpsgi 



DRAMATIS PERSONS 



Pygmalion, an Athenian sculptor 
Lucippe, a soldier . 
Chrysos. an art patron . 
Agesimos, Chrysos' slave 
Mimos, Pygmalion's slave 
Galatea, an animated statue 
Cynbca, Pygmalion's wife 
Daphne, Chrysos' wife . 
Myrine, P}gmalion's sister 



Gertrude Clarke. 

Edith Blair. 

Anna Warner. 

Leva Evan?. 

Annie Young. 

. Nora Burroughs. 

Myrtle Davis. 

Grace Washburn. 

. Gertrude Tones. 



(82) 



Christian Endeavor ^o^tefVv 



President. 
MARTHA A. BAKER. 

Vice- Preside n t. 
ANNA WARNER. 



Secretary. 
RUTH MERRIAM. 



Corresponding Secretary. 
GERTRUDE TAGGART 



Treasurer. 
ETHEL LOUD. 



ALICE CLARKE. 



Lookout Committee. 
ALICE MARTIN. 



IDA TROWBRIDGE. 



BESS HAYWARD. 



Prayer- m ee ting Co m mittee. 
LILIAN TAGGART. 



LUELLA HOUGHTON. 



Temperance Committee. 
ANNA AMPT. 



Missionary Committee. 
RUTH KIMBALL. 



Music Committee. 
ANNA WARNER. 



EMMA GRANT. 



Social Committee. 
LILIAN HOCKMAN. 



MAY STANLEY. 



(83) 



^tsstonar^ 3ociet^. 





President. 






JULIA TULLEYS. 






Vice-President. 






ALICE CLARKE. 




Secretary. 




Treasurer 


EDITH HOWE. 


Corresponding Secretary. 
MISS A. W. ALLEN. 

Executive Committee. 


GERTRUDE TAGGART. 


MISS PACKARD. 


EMELINE CARLISLE. 


MARTHA BAKER 



<4oang Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 



Secretary. 
KATHERINE PIERCE. 



President. 
EMELINE CARLISLE. 



(8 4 ) 



Ti-easurer. 
ADA CADMUS. 



Senior ^Statistics. 



NAME. 


Called 


Ahoays Found 


Distinguishing 
Characteristic*. 


Lacks 


Amount of 
Inttlligence 


Favorite 
Phrase. 


Struck on 


Will become 


Ella F. Ampt 


" Eller." 


With Blanche. 


Giggling. 


Dignity. 




Ha! ha! 


Blanche. 


A doctor's 
wife. 


Martha Avery . 


" Miseavery." 


Flirting. 


Giddiness. 


Reserve. 


Hang it! 


Dancing 


An actress. 


Bessie Bailey 


" Bess." 


In hall centre. 


Worrying. 


Daring. 


Would you? 


Her Bishop. 


The Bishop's 
wife. 


M. Louise Barnes 


'* Lou." 


Walking the 
halls. 


Frivolity. 


Several things. 


Darn ! 


"M. I. T." 


An architect. 


Isabel E. Bronson 


"Bell." 


Hunting Ads. 


Spunk. 


A voice. 


Aw! 


•> 


A lawyer. 


{Catherine J. Bucknum . . 


"Jane." 


Writing letters.* 


Her laugh. 


Color. 


" By Jove ! " 


One of the 
minor prophets. 


Mrs. 
Colorado Jo. 


Josephine B. Chandler . . 


"Jo." 


Reading " The 
Dartmouth." 

Working for the 
" Leaves." 


Dartmouth Pin. 


New 
acquaintances. 


How green 
the trees are. 


Dartmouth. 


Sombody's 
wife. 


Alice W. Clarke 


"A.Clarke." 


Bravery. 


Contributors. 


Won't you 
Write? 


" The Leaves." 


Something — 
in time. 


Mary B. Cruikshank .... 


" Marue." 


Making 
Harvard flags. 


Fondness for 
Harvard. 


" Gentlemen 
friends." 


"My friend." 


We '11 never 
tell who. 


A professional 
photographer. 


Annie F. Cushing 


"Ann." 


Studying 
French. 


Her smile. 


" A Dew song." 


She never talks. 


"A Peak." 


Salesgirl in 
Huyler's. 


Virginia S. Ellison .... 


"Cat." 


Walking. 


Industry. 


Ability to 
fall in love. 


Law7.ee! 


Gertrude. 


Schoolma'am. 


Grace P. Englehart ... 


"Englehart." 


In her 
bath -robe. 


Volume of 
voice. 


Music 
in her soul. 


come, now. 


Mandolin. 


A society belle. 


Annie J. Hackett 


"Alfannie 
Halfackett." 

"Bess." 


In the Library. 


Brilliancy. 


Height. 


That makes me 
tired. 


Roast beef. 


A trained 
nurse. 


Bessie S. Hayward .... 


Studying. 


Ambition. 


R's. 


I have n't got 
time. 


Study. 


A " new 
woman." 


Susan B. Hayward .... 


" Susie." 


Hunting Alice. 


The way she 
opens a door. 


Humor. 


A-1-i-c-e. 


Frank. 


An authoress. 


Lestra M. Hibberd . . . 


" Lestra." 


In her own 
room. 


Frankness. 


Fellows. 


" You big 
nigger." 


All fellows. 


The wife of 
some fellow. 


Helen M. Holman .... 


" Little 
Holman." 

" Mother 
Hubbard." 


Reading the 
Encyclopedia. 


Has n't any. 


A French 
Dictionary. 


"0 shoot." 


Being a Senior. 


A farmer's 
wife. 


Louise P. Hubbard .... 


In hall centre. 


Losing things. 


Squash pie. 


" Write me a 
note." 


Ann. 


Matron of an 
orphan asylum. 


Blanche L. Kelley 


" President 
Kelley." 


With a strike. 


Fickleness. 


More "strikes." 


" Great Hen ! " 


Being 
conspicuous. 


An old maid. 


Ethel D. Loud 


" Loud E." 


In Jo's room. 


"Kittenish" 
disposition. 


Common sense. 


" Won't that 
be nice." 


Jo. 


Kindergarten 
teacher. 


Kate S. Pennell 


" Kit." 


Practising. 


Evenness of 
temper. 


Nothing much. 


I reckon. 


Newspaper 
men. 


A star at 
Keith's. 


Florence A. Ray 


"Floss." 


In 25. 


Commanding 
disposition. 


A " strike." 


Girls! 


Herself. 


Commander-in- 
chief of an army 


Cara A. Sawin 


" Cara." 


Reading the 
letter. 


Smoothness. 


Something to 
rave over. 


How perfectly 
fine. 


50 Grays. 


Anything she 
wants to. 


Margie M. Schuberth . . . 


" Marge." 


" Bumming." 


Fiery temper. 


Weight. 


"Odear." 


Life in general. 


Train caller in 
B. & A. station. 


Julia Tulleys 


" Jule." 


" Where she is 
most needed." 


Stability. 


Vanity. 


W-e-1-1. 


No one. 


A sister of 
charity. 


Ella W. Wilson 


"Eli." 


Answering 
proposals. 


Falling in love. 


A fellow to get 
struck on. 


" You make 
me tired." 


Africa ( !). 


An African 
missionary. 



* To Jonah. 



W 




|HE Editors of the Allerlei, — worn out by storm and strife, 
In the vain endeavor to persuade the Faculty to like 
Whatever they might choose to place within this wondrous book, 
Betook themselves, one lovely eve, to a cool and shady nook. 

So full of interest were they in talking o'er their woe, 
That 'most before they knew it, the sun was sinking low. 
Oh, then they stood in terror for they were far from home, 
And in the coming darkness knew not which way to roam. 

And while they thought and pondered on what they 'd better do, 
From out the lonely thicket a raven by them flew, 
And close behind the raven, in many a tattered rag, 
Came limping, halting, mumbling, a bent and withered hag. 

" Who comes within my sacred haunts? " she cried in shrillest tones ; 
"My raven, oh, my raven, oh, where is he?" she moans. 
"Your raven just has passed us," said they in quivering fright ; 
(t Can you tell us where the path is, in all this dark and night? " 



(86) 



" A dreadful storm is coming, you 'd best come to my tent," 

Then mumbled words and clasped her hands and seemed on mischief bent. 

Back then came the raven and nestled on her arm ; 

" Ah, there, there, my beauty, to you they '11 do no harm." 

Then in the gloom and darkness the rain began to fall, 

And soon the lassies found themselves within the gypsy's hall ; 

A fire therein burning was casting ghostly shades 

On all the objects round about these sadly frightened maids. 

" Now hang that kettle o'er the fire," said she, " and place it well, 
And to you then, my lassies dear, your fortunes I will tell." 
Oh, then the girls sprang forward and all together said, 
" Oh, tell us the fortunes of the Senior Class instead." 

"And what may be the Senior Class? Come, speak right up and tell." 
" Of course, we mean, by Senior Class, the Seniors at Lasell " 
" Of course, of course, " she muttered, and shivered with cold, 
And tossed into the kettle bits of glass, some green, some gold. 

And after many stirrings and mumbled words and sighs, 

There came from out that kettle, before astonished eyes, 

Six and twenty lovely birds of shape and plumage rare, 

Which chirped and fluttered blithely o'er those maids so bright and fair. 

" These messengers of good and ill, that hover now above, 
Will sing to you the futures of the class that you all love. 
So stay you here until the dawn shines in at yonder door. 
I leave you now ; good luck, farewell ; hither return no more." 
C«7) 



And these are the songs, if truth be told, the Juniors heard that night, 
As they waited there in the gypsy's hut for the coming of the light ; 
And these are the songs the birdlings sang in tones so sweetly keen, 
And these, indeed, are the futures of the bonny "Gold and Green." 

The first maid that we sing of, she is sweet " Ella A.," 

And she '11 go. laughing, through this world, yes, laughing all the way. 

In the end she '11 win "the doctor," and over him she '11 rave, 

E'en though she 's " the old man's darling," instead of the " young man's slave." 

The next is Martha Avery, who in a ship will sail, 
But oh, alack ! and oh, alas ! her sad fate now bewail ; 
She '11 weep so much upon that ship, so many tears will fall, 
That down into the salty brine go ship and crew and all. 

Bess Bailey, as her aim in life, a " Bishop's " wife will be ; 

In after years when you go back the great Lasell to see, 

You '11 find the Bishop and his wife, not rich as in days of yore, 

For they '11 be selling chestnuts at Lasell's great oaken door. 

Marie L. Barnes, in after years, in Huyler's you will find, 
Selecting luscious candies of every sort and kind 
For Harvard men to send their friends who stay at old Lasell, 
Where "Candy rule" is o'er and gone, as each account could tell. 

Belle Bronson, at some future day, a lecturer will be ; 

You should hear her tell the wonders of the land and of the sea, 

For she can talk quite fluently on any subject made, 

Because a learned foundation at dear Lasell was laid. 
(88) 



Kit Bucknum will quite happy be, and marry young in life, 

And make for some one, — what's his name? — a good and happy wife. 

His name I really cannot tell, but this much you shall know, 

He 's handsome, nice, and " dreadful 'cute," and his name, it rhymes with foe ! 

Jo Chandler's heart — a fickle thing — from place to place will roam, 

But finally at Dartmouth will find a happy home. 

But there, alas ! is just as far as we, indeed, can go, 

For the name of him at Dartmouth we none of us do know. 



A. Clarke will be the chieftain of a paper, strong and good, 

And all the girls who knew her here will say, "We thought she would," 

And will send her subscriptions in numbers by the score ; 

Each year she '11 have to send out there five hundred copies more. 



Mame Cruikshank and Ann Cushing, together they will be 
Professors in a foreign land across the briny sea ; 
In astronomies they '11 excel, and each will marry soon, 
For both, you know, were very fond of studying the moon. 

Virginia will be, hark ye ! somebody's precious pride, 
Somebody's little darling, somebody's bonny bride. 
This was her wish, to fall in love, and this thing shall she do; 
Her longed-for fortune we will grant, we of the Allerlei crew. 



Grace Englehart and Annie H. in hospitals spend their days; 
Charming, indeed, these girls '11 be, with their sweet little comforting ways, 
Healing the poor sick folk and making them well and strong, 
Sending forth from their loving hands a glad and happy throng. 
(*9) 



Bess Hayward then, with earnest zeal, will teach for several years, 
And for her great success in life we none of us have fears. 
And after a while a Baltimore man will claim her for his wife, 
And like the folks in fairy tales, they '11 lead a happy life. 

Susie Hayward, to her joy, her mission soon will find 

By founding homes for animals of every sort and kind ; 

Dogs, cats, and rabbits, e'en a horse shall be well cared for there ; 

She too will have much joy in life, though her days be full o' care. 

Louise P. Hubbard, oh, Louise, now you '11 be glad, we know, 

For all the time, year in, year out, from flower-time to snow, 

You'll have the care of an orphans' home; then, like the dame in the shoo. 

There'll be so many children that you won't know what to do. 

Helen Holman and Ethel Loud play Shakespeare on the stage ; 
And about ten years from this time, you '11 find these artists all the rage ; 
Of course they '11 infinitely improve on the actors gone before, 
And all Lasell flock out to see, but sit quite near the door ! 

Florence Ray will wed the governor of the dear old Gilded State, 
And the luck of California from that time will surely date, 
For Florence, not contented with the way he '11 run affairs, 
Will put him out of office and take herself its cares. 

Sweet Lestra H. will marry, and live next her dearest Blanche, 
Who will wed a wealthy farmer and make cheese in a ranch 
Away off in California, with no neighbors very near, 

But since they '11 know the governor's wife, they '11 have great fun, don't fear. 
(90) 



Kit Pennell will fall in love six times, in Western noise and whirl ; 
At last the man she leally wants will take another girl, 
And then she '11 come back East once more and calmly settle down, 
With one of the Eastern business men in a Massachusetts town. 

Our Cara S. will make a name as an accomplished cook ; 
You must some day, when you have time, just give her house a look, 
And many a cook-book you will find with " Sawin " on the cover ; 
"You'd better buy one; just the thing," she says, "to win a lover." 

Marge Schuberth says she '11 stay at home, be lazy for a time, 
And what she will do after that, I '11 not tell in this rhyme ; 
She may go East, she may go West, she '11 have a wondrous fate ; 
In such a marvellous Senior Class, each one must sure be great. 

J. Tulleys in a mission trip to foreign lands will go, 
She wished to go to India, but E. Wilson begged her so 
To go with her to Africa to meet — oh, never mind, 
But any way they '11 happy be and many joys they '11 find. 

Thus ends at last the prophecy of the Class of Ninety-six, 

If you find it is not true, this prophet 's in a fix ; 

But blame not us, the birds' own words to tell, we sure have tried, 

But if they 're false, we 're much afraid those little birds have lied. 

And now we add to what we 've said, to all that we have told, 
The " Red and White " good wishes send to the bonny " Green and Gold " ; 
And when we take your places, may our own hearts be as true, 
And always ever faithful to our dear Lasell's true blue. 

(90 



Wanted ! 



Laughing gas. — E. -MPT. 

A whale to deliver up "Jonah." — K. B-CKN-M. 

Another " Daisy." — F. ~Ry. 

A game of "Arthurs." — M. F-X-N. 

Some other girl to hold his hand. — M-J-R B-NY-N. 

A Librarian for her "Circulating Library." — G. W-SHB-RN. 

Some spare time. — V. -LL— S-N. 

Ten more florists to support. — ED-TH Gr-NT. 

"John" (Cooper??) — G. Cl-RK- 

Willing contributions for the "Leaves." — A. Cl— RK— . 

A correspondent. — D-V-S Sisters. 

A jailer for L-str- H-bb-rd. — A. K-MB-LL. 

A voice strengthened — A. W-RN-R. 

A " Cur." — E. YV-LS-N. 

A lot of uncancelled South American Stamps. — J. -LDR-CH. 

The ability to go up four steps at a time. — A. H-CK-TT, S. H-YW-RD, A. Ci-kk 

A letter from B-n. — C-R- S-W-N. 

A remedy for insomnia. — C. G— LL. 

Another " Mo(w)e(r)." — M. M-Y-. 

Something to drink. — M. Gr-sw-LD. 

A new laugh. — G-RG- P-CK. 

A chance to recite in class. — B-SS -DS-N. 

" Lights out." — M-ss -v-ns. 

(93) 



A l5eaf from a Janior's Dtar^. 



WEDNESDAY, Oct. 30, '95.— Oh! this has been a miserable day, but at last I am allowed 
to have a minute to myself, even if it is 1 1 P. m., and I must sit with my light in the closet. 




To begin with, there was a committee meeting of six of the Juniors to read over some plays, 
and in order to be present, I had to get up at half-past five — oh, how I hated to do it! 
Well, my troubles, I found, had just begun, for at eight o'clock I recited a special lesson in history; at 
nine I had a music lesson; at 9.40, French; at 10.20, Latin; and at eleven, Gym. Then came a brief 
breathing space to get some lunch, after which I had to hurry upstairs to look over my English. 
After English, more hurrying into German, and from there to Shakespeare, where I spent a very uncom- 
fortable hour, as Miss C. would allow no cushions and I was so tired I could hardly sit up. After 
Shakespeare, I ran outdoors for about twenty minutes; came in, had Orphean Club, and then hurried 
upstairs to get ready for Miss Call's class. That left me barely time to get down to dinner. Imme- 
diately after chapel there was a regular meeting of the Junior Class, and as there was so much trouble 
over the play and Allerlei, we didn't get back upstairs until 8.15. Since then I have been simply cram- 
ming until this minute, and as my watch says 1 1.30, I think I had better "turn in," if I don't want to be 
disgracefully late for breakfast to-morrow. 



(94) 



Commonplace. 




T was Saturday evening, two weeks before vacation; it was likewise hot, — so hot 
that the girls were fanning themselves vigorously with the covers of the hymn books 
and had their handkerchiefs stuffed in their collars to keep them from wilting. 
Professor had just returned from the West Indies ; we were having an extra long 
chapel hour, as he had picked up, on the way, several interesting things to say to us.' 

Presently we heard, " Excused ! " Everyone made a grand rush for the post-office ; the 
halls echoed with familiar shouts : "Anything in sixty-one? " 2 — " Oh, good ! got a letter from Jim ! ' 
''What is the matter with the people at home? They must all have small-pox, hydrophobia, 
or mumps ; I have n't had a letter for twenty years." 3 By twos and threes the girls strolled 
out on to the porch, then scattered to the four points of the campus. 4 The tall Senior president 
and the equally huge " district schoolmarm," as usual, with their arms twined around each other's 
waists, strolled out, too, and set off down the hill ; an insignificant little Special calling out as 
they passed the porch steps, "Round and round, and round they go." 1 ' She was only jealous, 
however; so they passed by unheeding. 

"Betty," said the schoolmarm, when they reached one of the benches, "don't you hope 
no one comes to disturb us? I haven't seen you in a perfect age." 6 



1 This is a joke. 
- This is another. 
3 School-girl license. 



4 This is joke No. 3. 

5 She was punning on their arms. 

6 According to the clock, five minutes. 



(95) 



Betty responded only by a pressure of the hand. " Now let 's have a good, old-time 
talk, for we won't have many more chances. To begin with, — did you hear that crash this 
afternoon, and do you know what it meant?" 

" No, but I heard something at dinner about beer bottles. What about it? " asked the president. 

" Why, Molly's brother sent Min a bottle of beer for a joke. She set it on the window- 
sill, for lack of a better place, and, woe to the blue ribbon ! That bottle o' beer and all fell to 
the ground, — but to rise again. You can imagine the rest. Oh, the Faculty!" 7 

' That 's nearly equal to Violet's corn-plaster act. You know she could n't find her corn- 
plaster for ever so long, until one morning she picked up her shoe and on the outside of it 
was that plagued plaster." 8 

Just then came a voice, harshly breaking in upon their tender confidences, — and this is 
what they heard : — 

"Fancy Betty's saying that the best cure for hydrophobia is to keep away from the dog ! " 9 
It was a '97 telling Betty's latest and most brilliant remark to her class sisters. 

"Here are Betty and the schoolmarm," continued this odious retailer of other people's 
bright sayings. " Let 's sit down and have a chat, I suppose we '11 be welcome. 10 Hello, girls, 
what did you think of Professor's discourse? And did you see Belle go up and present him 
with the onion which she has carefully kept for him during his absence?" He seemed greatly 
pleased with her thoughtfulness." 

Betty looked at the schoolmarm, the schoolmarm looked at Betty, as if perfectly resigned 
to a chatter like this for an hour. We know both wished for Maude's alarm clock which now 
reposes in some Tech fellow's room, but which once did duty outside the parlor window. 1 "' 

7 No. 4. ,u This is sarcasm. 

8 Joke 5. " No. 7. 

9 Joke 6. 12 During Easter vacation. 

(96) 



" Oh, Annette, I am about to suggest to Mr. Halloway that you would make a pretty 
good wife for him, because it would be lots easier to supply you with iron dollars than with 
silver." 13 "Hello, May! There are our callers, and Mick's, too. Wonder if she'll have on her 
pleasant, agreeable smile to-night." 14 

"Guess I'll have to go in and rest up," said another; "I feel one of my awful headaches 
coming on and am sadly afraid I'll not be able to go to church to-morrow. 15 So tra-la-lu." 

Betty and the schoolmarm were just settling themselves to finish their tctc-a-tete when, 
with a pang of dismay, they saw the inconveniently rather animated invalid retrace her steps, 
and heard her say, " I almost forgot to tell you how two of the Sophs distinguished themselves 
to-day. They saw a horse, attached to a cart, coming slowly down the street, minus the driver. 
The girls having just recited their history lesson about the brave deeds of — what 's his name, 
that man who jumped into the chasm to save Rome? — concluded to get their class into history, 
stopped the animal, turned him around, and slowly and painfully led him back to the boulevard, 10 
only to be met with the consoling remark, — 'That my horse? Yes, he knows the way home. 
Just turn him around and let him go.' " l/ 

Just then the air vibrated with a piercing shout, and the girls involuntarily clutched each 
other. After a minute's pause the schoolmarm said with a laugh, "Oh! it's only the Juniors 
practising their class yell; they are awfully proud of it!" 



13 Memento of " Economics." Vo Refer you to Miss Nutt. 

14 Joke 8. 16 To be. 

""Lights of '98." 

(97) 




^> 



G. W. Great discretion should be used in the dis- 
posal of signs. 

Bobby. Duck trousers and a cut-away coat do not 
make a stylish combination. 

Inquirer. Refer all questions concerning the 
modern French authors to the Junior Class. 

S. D. Consult Young's Encyclopaedia for infor- 
mation about Clara Barton's early life. 

K. and Company. A girl over sixteen should wear 
her skirts below her ankle. I know nothing of your 
military drill. 

Sweet Ape. If you must cut be very careful that 
you do not confuse visitors with teachers when you try 
to explain your absences. 

Hopeful. You should only insinuate, not an- 
nounce, your engagement while at school, as it affords a 
subject for discussion. 



Subscriber. " A militia is a man between the ages 
of eighteen and forty-five, — " See Davis's Definitions of 
Military Terms, published by us for eight shillings or two 
dollars. 

Invalid. If your " severe cold" was first noticed 
on Sunday morning, it would be utterly impossible to 
cure it before Monday evening. 

Violinist. You need give no thought to the posi- 
tion of your music rack. It is better to submit grace- 
fully and to allow your instructor to place it as he wishes. 

Anxious Parent. I should suggest Kimball's 
Grammar and Young's Arithmetic as good text-books 
for your little son. Both are reliable works and may be 
had at any book store. 

Chapel. You can find no other question which 
presents so many difficulties as this, '"Can ensemble C 
meet at 2.30? " Great minds have long been perplexed 
over it and as yet no solution has been found, 



(98) 




3entor Library. 



Jo Chandler 
Susie Hayward 
Alice Clarke 
Bess Bailey 
Florence Ray 
Blanche Kelley 
Annie Hackett 



" Echoes from Dartmouth." 

" We Two " 

" Love Affairs of a Bishop." 
"Hold Up Your Heads, Girls." 
"A Rose in Bloom." 
"A Little Rebel." 



f99^ 



Louise Hubbard 
Ella Wilson 
Ethel Loud 
Bessie Hayward 
Ann Cushing 
Julia Tulleys 
Virginia Ellison 
Kit Pennell 
Martha Avery . 
Lestra Hibberd . 
Ella Ampt 
Belle Bronson . 
Grace Englehart 
Car a Sawin 
Helen Holman . 
Marge Schuberth 
Mame Cruikshank 
Kate Bucknum . 
Marie Barnes 



"Cook Book." * 

"Great Expectations." 

"Duty." 

"A Sensible Young Woman." 

"A Born Player" 

"Brave and True." 

"Work." 

" Newspapers ! " 

" Pushing Toward the Front." 

"All Sorts and Conditions of Men." 

"Chatterbox." 

" Practical Housekeeping." 

"How to Play the Mandolin." 

"Letters of Love." 

" Dictionary." 

"How to get Strong." 

"Harvard Stories." 

"The Book of Joel " 

"Mother Goose." 



* Squash Pie Recipes. 
(ioo) 



C°^l^iAr-rn5 




A Dictionary of the 

♦ ♦♦♦English 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Language* 




As used at 

.... Lasell 



. . . . Seminary. 



S> 



S> 



Explanatory, 
Pronouncing, 
Etymological, and 
Synonymous. 



S> 



All rights reserved. 



E>asell Dictionary. 



Cap and Gown, n. One of the 
essentials of Seniorhood, used to 
manifest dignity and knowledge ; 
that which covers a multitude of 
defects. 

Def'-i-cit, n. (from French, defere, 
that which remains). The portion 
which is left as a remuneration for 
the business manager after all ac- 
counts are settled. 

Syn. Bills ; broke ; in the hole ; 
paternal expostulations ; insomnia. 
" The deficit will be made up by 
the Junior class " 

Di-plo'-ma, n. The long coveted 
piece of parchment for which every 
Senior is ready to imperil life itself. 

Fac'-ul-ty, n. (from Lat. fa cu la, a 
small candle). Usually the lesser 
lights in a college, but, nevertheless, 
often causing great havoc in the ju- 
dicious undertakings of the students. 
The faculty says, " Thou shalt have 
no grinds in the Allerlei." C. C. B. 

Fresh'-man, 11. (from La\. freshus, 
meaning verdant). A novice; one 



just learning the rudiments of knowl- 
edge. 

Grad-u-a'-tion, 11. " That far-off 
divine event toward which the whole 
creation moves." 

Syn. Society ; engagement. 

Jun'-ior, n. One who is prema- 
turely well educated. 
Syn. Allerlei. 

Love, n. A temporary substitute 

for beefsteak. 

Syn. Lack of appetite ; ten- 
dency to letter-writing every day. 

Prep, n. (from Lat. prepo, to 
carry) . A small pestiferous being. 

Rush, v. i. The friendly advances 

made to a neophyte. 

Syn. S. D. Society, Lasellia 
Club. 

Sem'-in-ary, n. A place where 
little girls are trained ; an institution 
which fosters worship of the adorable 
college fellow. 

Syn. Candy ; good times. 

Sen'-ior (from French senere, to 

(io 4 ) 



become aged). Those who have 

acquired great knowledge. (Obs.) 

An egotistical ignoramus. 

Syn. Cap and gown; 1,500 
words empty of meaning. 

Soph'-o-more, 11. (Lat. sophos, 
wise, and moror, to be a fool). A 
wise fool. 

Spe'-ctal, 11. A noisome pesti- 
lence. 

Strin'-gen-cy, 11. Severe tight- 
ness of the money markets. A con- 
tagious disease from which Last 11 
suffers a great deal. 

Syn. E. Blair ; M. Davis. 

Strike, 11. An epidemic which is 
the bane of every novice in Lasell. 
Syn. E. Grant; D. Aull. 

The'-ism, 11. The non-tempo- 
rality and interdependence of the 
cosmological transcendentalism and 
teleological potentialities of im- 
manent determinism in the light of 
the absolute dynamic unconditioned- 
ness of the world grounds. (Obs.) 



Ta^en from t)ife. 



Place — Lasell, Room cxxx. Time — up. m. 

Dramatis Person/e. 

Kate, ....... Owner of Room cxxx. 

Alice, 

Susie, 

Violet, ) • • Girls at Feast. 

Jennie, I 

Grace, / 

Three Musicians. 

Miss T Preceptress. 

ACT I. 
Music — " On with the dance, let joy be unconfined." 

Scene One. 

We stumble as we enter, for a blanket drapes the door, so that only a dim and holy light is diffused from the 
incandescent, covered — oh ! horror of horrors ! — by a Senior's gown. A hand grasps mine and leads me to the 
post of honor, — the bed post. But surely my pride is short-lived, for I lose my hold and pitch headlong upon 
the festive board, knocking over the wash-bowlful of lemonade. The contents rush in an impetuous stream over the 
bare feet of one damsel who, in her haste to avoid becoming a mermaid in a pond, throws Kate into the screen. 
As Kate's head strikes the board, she murmurs, "Heaven preserve us from our friends." 

Music — " And the band played on." 
(105) 



Scene Two. 

Music by members below the window, presumably by members of the genus Junius ho?no — "There's only one girl 

in the world for me ! " 

Straightway every girl, as if she were the " only one " for those misguided youths, springs to the window. 
" Oh !" exclaimed Violet, "Will is the bass. Doesn't he sing just too grand?" While jealous Susie responds, 
" Wait till the dog catches him and he '11 sing a different tune." But as the strains of " Fair Harvard " float softly up, 
peace is restored, and these ardent admirers of the denizens of that not far distant college applaud vigorously, in 
their frantic efforts knocking off the sill an unoffending ginger ale bottle, placed there to cool. The ale, indignant at 
such ill treatment, becomes greatly worked up, and just as it hits Will's head, explodes. The unhappy youth follows 
suit, but in a different way. Ah ! the air turns blue at the words. We may not chronicle them. Softly the moon- 
beams shine o'er all. 

Music — " There 's nothing half so sweet as love's young dream." 



ACT II. 

Scene One. 

A knock at the door. Noiselessly (or so the girls think) the crowd disperses. Susie and Violet run for the 
closet ; Alice rolls under the bed ; while Jennie and Grace try vainly to hide behind each other With a happy 
thought, Kate drops to her knees, and mumbles something which might be a prayer and might not. Another knock 

and a voice which sends terror to all hearts, the voice of Miss T , saying: "Miss Kate, what are you doing?" 

The culprit responds, " Praying, Miss T ." Miss T , long experienced, hereupon opens the door, catching, as 

she does so, a glimpse of the feet of Jennie and Grace, as their owners join Alice. Inexpressibly shocked, she says : 
"Girls, go to your rooms, and see me to-morrow at 10.30 about this. Miss Kate, the next time this uncontrollable 
desire for religious exercises seizes you at midnight, you will kindly conduct prayers alone, unaided by Harvard 
serenaders and eatables of any sort." 

Music — " After the ball." 

Scene Two. — Office of Miss T . 



She speaks : " Young ladies, not only have you broken the Guide to Life,* but you have degraded yourselves, 

and as you cannot be trusted, you will remain upstairs Class night, and will not attend the Harvard tea." — 

Curtain. 

Music — " Home, sweet home " 



* There are no rules at Lasell, only a " Guide to Life." 
fio6) 



E>aseU Alphabet 



A stands for Auction, to which we must go ; 
It's a matter of interest to all you may know. 



B stands for Bragdon, our principal man ; 

Just go and consult him; he'll do what he can. 

D is the best of all, namely our Drill; 

Our cadets are fine soldiers, and work with a will. 

F stands for Freshmen, who are, as a rule, 

No fresher than Sophomores, at least in this school. 

H stands for Hunger, and Homesickness, too ; 
You 're sure to feel one, should the other skip you. 



C means Canoe Club, the girls' chief delight; 

Their canoes skim the wave both by day and by night. 

E stands for Evans, the girls' friend so true ; 
What you do for Miss Evans, you never will rue. 

G means Gymnasium, where, limber and strong, 
You may cut up queer antics the whole hour long. 

I stands for Ink, for its stains, let me hope 
You never will fail to use Ivory Soap. 



J stands for Junior, brightest and best ; K stands for Kitchen, now hark ! this is so, 

Do you ask us for proof, let our book be the test. Here for practice in cooking the girls often go. 

L stands for Lewis, night-watchman, one who, M stands for Monday, which we at our whim 

If you don't watch him, will be sure to watch you. Fill with fun, work, or business, up to the brim. 

(107) 



N stands for Nigger, black horse in the stable ; O stands for Orphean, of which we are proud ; 

He '11 trot for our Principal fast as he 's able. In that club, no voice but the best is allowed. 

P stands for much, both for weal and for woe, — Q stands for Quartette, the voices are fine; 

Post, Punishment, Pictures, or "Pay what you owe." If you wish you can hear them, they practise at nine. 

R stands for Regulars, these are the girls S stands for Swimming Pool, where all the day 

Who work and have fun till the "Special's" head whirls. The swimmer has work and the simmer has play. 

stands for Tears, which the " new girls " do shed U stands for Unlucky, whose typical lass, 

At dinner, at chapel, and often in bed. Is the one who can't graduate, dropped from her class. 

V stands for Vows of devotion 'twixt friends ; W stands for Women, which we '11 be ere long ; 

It depends who the girls are, just how it all ends. Let us be in our hearts, minds, and physiques quite strong. 

X stands for X rays, with which soon we'll be shown Y stands for Yell, which you surely must hear; 

To what wonderful stature our young minds have grown. It won't bear repeating, but you '11 hear it — next year. 

Z stands for the Zeal of our class good and true, 

For Class Ninety-seven is " Loyal en to///." 



(108) 



Rjiles an( I Reflations 

FOR LASELL READING ROOM. 



I. 

One bell for page. 
Two bells for ice water. 
Three bells for "John." 

II. 

At no time between 7 a. m. and 9 p. m. shall absolute quiet reign in the Reading Room, as such a state 
of affairs is not conducive to good work. 

III. 

The Reading Room is the place for social jovialities and business conversations : these are not to be held 
in the halls, or in private rooms. 

IV. 

Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors are requested to use the chairs only. The tables and ladders are 
reserved for the Seniors. 

V. 

All guests shall be entertained here, and shown points of interest from the windows. 

(109) 



VI. 

No book shall be returned to its proper place under penalty of the law. 



VII. 

This is the only place in the building where snickering and tittering are allowed. 

VIII. 

When there is great demand for a reference book, do not use it yourself, but sit with your elbow upon 
it and look off into space. 

IX. 
Read, laugh, and cry over all letters here ; as such a performance does not make one conspicuous. 

X. 

Especially bright girls are always found here, willing to aid stupid pupils with their lessons. 

Librarian, Miss Tulleys. 
Assistant, Miss Avery. 

Miss De Forest. 
Guards, \ Miss A. Kimball. 

Miss K. Chapman. 



N. B. — Three new guards wanted. Address applications to 



Miss Tulleys. 



(no; 




Septwbsr. 

19. School opened. 

20. New girls had their voices tried. 

21. Reception to new girls. 

22. Memorial service to Mrs. Steele. 

23. Music lessons arranged. 

30. Excursions to Nantasket, Bunker Hill and Navy Yard. 



(in) 




October. 

3. Hamlet. "Enter the first gravedigger." 

5. Cooking began. 

7. Excursion to Concord. 

8. Chorus classes arranged. 

9. Piano lessons arranged. 

1 " I Irving and Terry. 
17.3 

24. " Dick " died. 
26. First law lecture. 
31. "Carmen Sylva." 



(112) 



f/ovemb<?r. 

2. First appearance of tea-table in parlor, Saturday evening. 

3. Bible class omitted. 

7. Mr. B.'s horse ate a cake of tar soap. 

9. Music in parlor. Saturday evening. 

13. No sherbet for dinner. 

14. Auction. 

19. We didn't hear Paderevvski. 

20. "Sterling" sugar tongs in the dining-room. 
23. Mrs. Lincoln's marketing lesson. 

25. Treasurer's laundry-bag not ready at nine o'clock. 

27. Dr. Heron's lecture on "Sociology." 

28. Thanksgiving. 

Last of the law lectures. 

3° 



•I 



Realistic Reading Convention. 



(113) 




5. Seventeen Seniors were so enchanted with the study of English that they 
begged Miss W. to meet them in No. 6, after chapel, to continue the 
delightful pursuit. 

9. Brown University concert. 
11. Pupils' musical rehearsal. 

16. Scraper and crumb-tray at Miss C.'s table. 

17. Elocution exhibition. 
19. School closed. 



(114) 




January. 

( School opened. 
9 '1 A. A. had "D. T.'s." 

1 8. Shadow pantomimes. 

f Chaplain McCabe here. 

19. < 

( Chocolate ice-cream for dinner. 

25. Who made molasses candy? 
27. German entertainment. 
30. Day of Prayer. 



("5) 




February. 

6. Lecture on "Romance of the New World." 

8. G. W. embraces the floor in cooking class. 

9. No one went to church. 
10. Organ recital. 

19. Miss Beufey read, "Willy, Willy!" 

22. Annual masquerade. 

25. Somebody tried to find out the composition of H 2 S CXi by tasting it. 



(116) 




^gSPr^- 



ff\are\). 

5. Henry IV. "Now, Girls." 

/ Seniors appear in caps and gowns. 
7. -j Junior play. 

( "Spread." 
12. What happened at Miss Nutt's table? The table wants to know. 
19. Lecture on "The Ring and the Book." 

21. Lecture on "The Evils of Red Slippers, Peanuts, and Banana Peel." 
25. Pupils' musical rehearsal. 



("7) 



ppril. 

i. Easter vacation began. 

8. Back to work. 

16. "Parliamentary Discipline." "I rise to a point of order." 

23. Miss White sang. 

27. Instrumental Concert. 



may. 

4. Senior play. 



(118) 



Class 5 on S- 




NDER. thy flag, so bonny and blue, 
Nineteen fond hearts beat loyal to you, 
Bound by the closest of loving ties, 

Held by class friendship that never dies. 

Wave, honored flag, o'er the girls you love ; 

Send out thy silken folds far above 

All other banners, and to them tell 

The noble records of old Lasell. 



In future years, when school-days are past, 
May the Red and White still bind us fast, 
And the dearest thought of all then be, 
Our Junior Class, so fearless and free. 
And many a tear shall fill our eye, 
And perhaps we '11 often long to fly 
Back to the halls we loved so well, 
Back to the precincts of old Lasell. 



And to our motto may we be true, 
Faithful in all things, — " Loyal en tout" 
Brave forever to stand for the right, 
Make Lasell proud of the Red and White. 
Then Ninety-seven, in future years, 
Will not be thought of with sighs and tears, 
But when comes the day to say farewell, 
We shall hear, " Well done," from dear Lasell. 
(»9) 



She last U/ill ai)d 5<?stamer;t 



OF THE 



'97 AUerlei 5oard. 




THE '97 ALLERLEI BOARD, of Lasell Seminary, in the town of Auburndale, County 
of Middlesex, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, United States of America, having 
reached the age of discretion, being of sound mind and memory, considering the frailty 
of this transitory existence and remembering how soon I may be laid to rest, unknelled, 
uncofhned, and unsung, do hereby make, ordain, publish, and declare this to be my last writing and 
testament. 

FIRST. I order and direct my executors, hereinafter named, to pay all debts presented, and fitting 
funeral expenses, as soon after my decease as the power within them lies. 

Second. I hereby give to my Alma Mater, Lasell Seminary, in Auburndale, one history of my 
life, namely, " Allerlei of '97," to be kept and cherished as a memento of bygone glories. 

THIRD. I also give and bequeath to the Class of '97 my prayers that they may be kept from 
so severe a mental strain as has been mine, and this I do in return for their several and various desultory 
remarks upon me during my existence. 

FOURTH. After the payment of such expenses and debts, I give, devise, and bequeath my per- 
sonal effects and the following property to the '98 Allerlei Board, share and share alike; to wit: A 
valuable collection of autographs of prominent men, attached to documents of refusal to advertise; a 
large and exhaustive catalogue of all bad words in any language, whatsoever ; a book of selected remarks, 
delicately flattering my ability and edited by the Class of '96 ; the cordial hatred of several disappointed 
printers and publishers; several pairs of editorial shoes, antique and porous; a number of stubs of 

railroad tickets left by the business managers; numerous gray hairs from the august head of the editor-in- 

(120) 



chief, and valuable only for their association ; some exceedingly bad jokes and some very questionable 
poetry; the promise of soul-stirring compositions from various optimistic but forgetful students; 
the opportunities given by board meetings for the formation of everlasting feuds; a valuable assort- 
ment of personal effects, ranging from a hair-pin to a metal cut of the State House (given as security 
by advertisers) ; several golden chances to burn the midnight oil, practise self-control, and keep 
ever before one's despairing mind the rose-hued fiction that "behind the clouds the sun is shining " ; 
many pleasant remembrances and very best wishes; and, finally, knowledge of this precious truth, that of 
all the plagues which Heaven's wrath can send, the most tormenting evil is to be on the Alleilei Board. 

The remainder of my estate I bequeath for the founding of a hospital for my beloved teachers 
who have been obliged to hear the lessons of my several members during their Juniorhood. 

LASTLY. I make, constitute, and appoint the Faculty of Lasell Seminary my executors of this my 
last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made. 

In virtue whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal, this twenty-eighth 
day of April, in the year of our Lord the one thousand eight hundred and ninety-sixth. 

'97 ALLERLEI BOARD. 

" Blessed arc they ivho continue to the end." 



S»crf"d m The M(»q r* 
Vitt June 10 ,!<)(, 



C»n( bo' hot feMoTT,, 




(121) 



Index. 



Acrostic 

Allerlei Board 

Allerlei Board 

Alphabet 

Answers to Correspondents 

Appendix to Senior History 

Battalion 

Board of Trustees 

Calendar 

C. C. Bragdon 

Canoe Club . 

Christian Endeavor Society 

Class History, '96 

Class History, '98 

Class History, '99 

Class Night . 

Class Song . 

Coat of Arms 

Cooking Classes . 

Comentarii de Classico Juniorio 

Commencement Week 

Commonplace 

Cyclists 

Dedication . 

Dress Cutting 

Dictionary . 

Faculty 

Freshman Register 

Howell's Letter 

In Memoriam 



TAGE 

10 

17 
122 

107 
98 
54 
77 
23 

11 1 

13 

66 

83 
52 
40 

34 

79 

119 

101 

72 
46 
78 
95 
75 
14 
76 

i°3 

24 

33 
48 

57 



Junior Class 

Junior Entertainment 

Junior Register 

Edward Lasell 

Lasell Building 

Lasellia Members 

Lasellia Officers . 

Lasell Leaves 

Last Will and Testament 

Leaf from a Junior's Diary 

Mandolin and Guitar Club 

Missionary Society 

Orphean Club 

Preparatory Register 

Quartettes . 

Rules and Regulations 

Sophomore Register 

Senior Register 

Senior Entertainment 

Senior Statistics . 

Senior Prophecy . 

Senior Library 

S. D. Members 

S. D. Officers 

Shakespeare Class 

Specials 

Taken from Life . 

Wanted 

Young Woman's Christian Temperance Union 



PAGE 

19 
80 

45 
12 

10 

65 

63 

74 

120 

94 
7i 
84 
70 

29 

69 

109 

39 

5' 

80 

85 
86 

99 
61 

59 
68 

55 
105 

93 
84 



(123) 



Index to Advertisements. 



Babb, Edward E. & Co. 

Bent & Bush .... 

Bellevue Hotel .... 

Boston & Albany R. R. 

Bouquet, The .... 

Capstick, Wm. .... 

Chickering, Elmer 

Cobb, Aldrich & Co. . 

Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co 

Cook,T. D. &Co. 

Dame, Stoddard & Kendall 

De Wolfe, Fi^-ke & Co. 

Eddy, C. F. & Co. . 

Frost & Adams .... 

Hearn, Charles W. 

Hollander, L. P. & Co. . . 

Jenkins, O. A. & Co. . 

Johnson, George E. . 

Kansas Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Law rence, Wilde & Co. 



PAGE 

4 
126 

4 

3 
o 

130 

127 

5 

7 

128 

129 

128 

131 
127 

130 

1 
8 

131 
127 
132 



Long, Thomas & Co. . 
Melody, T. F. . 
Oriental Tea Company 
Plummer, Geo. A. & Co. 
Seaver, Chandler 
Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 
Shuman, A. & Co. 
Smith, Anthony & Co 
Springer Bros. . 
Stickney & Smith 
Stowell, A. & Co. 
Sturtevant & Haley 
Swan, Newton & Co. 
Thorndike, Joshua 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co 
Ward & Co. 
Wethern, George M. 
White, R. H. & Co. 
Whitney's . 
Wright, Albert F. 



PAGE 
125 

126 

132 

29 

132 

7 

I2 5 
130 

132 

131 

2 

J 3° 
126 
128 
129 

131 

126 
2 
6 

126 



Alfred Mudgb & Son, Printers, Boston. 



THE THOMAS LONG CO., 

Importers and Manufacturers of 

JEWELRY, DIAMONDS, 

and SILVERWARE. 
77 Summer Street, Boston. 



^ Shuman Corner *£ 

Spring and Summer, 1896. 



Ladies' Shirt Waists. 

In Madras Fabrics, French and American Percales and Lawns, Zephyrs, Jacquard Looms, Ginghams, Dimities, 
Swiss Muslins, etc., with and without Detachable Collars, Pointed Yokes both back and front, Bishop and 
Watermelon Sleeves, Hampden Collars, etc, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $3-50, $4.00. 
Ladies' Sweaters. 

In all colors and combinations of shades. $6.00, $6.50. 
Ladies' Dress Skirts. 

In Mohairs, Sicilians, Alpacas, Serges, etc., all lengths, $6.00, $8.00, $10.00, $12-00, $15.00, $20.00. 

Ladies' Bicycle Suits, Cloth and Straw Walking Hats, Chemisettes, Collars and Cuffs, Cuff Buttons, Belts, 
Buckles, etc., etc. 

A. SHUMAN & CO. 

WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STS., BOSTON. 

(125) 



S. B. Newton. 



C. F. Kidder. 



J. H. Richardson- 



Swan, Newton & Co., 



DEALERS IN 



BENT & 
BUSH 



^*5^*5^*5^* 



Poultry, Wild Garqe, 

Live Pigeons, Smoked Tongues, etc. 



18 AND 20 . . . 

Faneuil Hall Market, 



Boston, 



TELEPHONE, 928 HAYMARKET. 






MANUFACTURERS OF 



Caps 



IN ALL SHAPES. 

387 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 



_EOR_FinG miLLinGRY^i^ 

GEORGE M. WETHERN, 

21 and 23 Temple Place. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS GOODS AT POPULAR PRICES. 

All the latest novelties in FINE MILLINERY are shown on our 
counters as soon as in Paris, London or Berlin market. Your 
patronage is respectfully solicited. GEORGE m. wethern. 



ALBERT R WRIGHT, 

Registered ( B L«on mi ") Pharmacist 

Dispenser to Lasell Seminary. 

NICKERSON'S BLOCK, Ne ** Door to Post Office. 

WEST NEWTON. 



T. F. MELODY, 



Telephone 65-3. 


AUBURNDALE. 


Boarding, 

Baiting, 

Livery, 


% 
% 


and 

Sale 

Stable. 


Carriages a Specialty. 
Also, fine Coach Horses 


for Sale. 



(.126) 




Artistic Photographer. 



All students at Lasell are entitled to our regular 
School Rates for Cabinet Photos. The Aristo 
finish being used when requested. 

* ^ * "p*C * 

21 West Street - - BOSTON. 




i-EQ.OCfcK-UttM •^io- J uin< J w oci/) • ttuiH <--j iu otui 



J. P. DAVIS, President. 



W. M. WELLCOME, Vice-President. 



The superior location of the 



Kansas Mutual Life Insurance Company 

enables it to invest its funds in safe securities, bearing a high rate of interest. 

The result of such safe and profitable investments, coupled with an efficient and economical 
management, is large dividend returns to policy-holders, making the 

* * * KANSAS MUTUAL LIFE * ■* * 



not only safe beyond question, but most profitable to the insured. 

Correspond with W. F. LUNT, New England Manager, for full information. 

Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

(127) 



177 Devonshire 



Ladies' = = 



Located in ihe midst of the 
Shopping District. 



'lirce Large Attractive Dining- 
rooms. D.iniy Dishes. Nice 
Service 



Lunch = = 



The most reasonable first-class place to lunch. 
Convenient to Theatres. 

23=31 Avon Street, Boston. 

Cake, Bonbons, Salted Almonds, and 
Fancy Novelties at our Counter. 

T. D. COOK & CO., Caterers. 




LADIES^ 

Wishing to purchase the correct styles in 

Millinery *£ *£ 

at Lowest Prices should call at 
THE BOUQUET, 134 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 



Special Attention 
given to 
Mourning Orders. 



Joshua Thorndike, 



DEALER IN 



FVjuttori, Lamk 



\7eeJ. 



STALLS 3 and 5, 



New Faneuil Hall Market, 



BOSTON. 



ESTABLISHED 1800. 



Toilet Articles, Dog Collars, Muzzles, Leashes, Opera Glasses, Pocket Books, 

Purses, Manicure Supplies. 

DAME, STODDARD & KENDALL, 

Table Cutlery, Scissors, Pocket Knives, Plated Ware, Pishing Tackle, Sporting Goods. 

STERLING, RELAY, EAGLE BICYCLES. 

Kodak ; Poco ; Cameras, Bull's Eye, Premo. Developing: and Printing- a Specialty. 

370-372-374 W^SHINQTOIST STREET, 

OPPOSITE RROMFIELD STREET. 

Catalog-tie on Application. 

(128) 



GEO. A. PLUMMER & CO., 



531 and 533 WASHINGTON STREET, 



Ladies' Cloaks, Suits, 



Waists, Furs, 

MACKINTOSHES and CRAVENETTE GARMENTS. 
We Make a Specialty of Young Ladies' Garments on our SECOND FLOOR, 

Having always in stock the LATEST DESIGNS 
and STYLE3 at POPULAR PRICES. 

4®= Next Door to Boston Theatre. ■=£» 



BOOKS u 



all Departments of 
Literature — 



can be found at our store. The largest 
assortment in Boston of the popular and 
standard authors. 

Also a large variety at special re- 
ductions. 

Large variety of Bibles, Prayer Books, 
Booklets, etc. 

WE ARE NOTED FOR LOW PRICE*. 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., 

€r;e 2Jrct]t»aY Bookstore, 
361 and 365 Washington Street, Boston. 



T F You Draw or Paint, 

PURCHASE YOUR STJFPLIES OF 

Drawing Papers, Fine Colors for Oil, Water, 
China and Tapestry Painting, Brushes, 
Easels, Sketch Boxes, Scales, 
Triangles, Curves, T Squares, 
Drafting Instruments, and 

Artists' Materials 

Of All Kinds, 

From the Manufacturers . . . 

WADSWORTH, HOWLAND & CO., 

(Incorporated) 

82 and 84 "Washington St. 
and Grundmann Studios, Clarendon St- 
BOSTON. 

FACTORIES, MALDEN, MASS. 



(129) 



Sturtevant & Haley 
Beef and Supply Company, 



38 and 40 F. H. Market, 



BOSTON. 



BEEF, PORK, LARD, HAMS, 



At Wholesale and Retail. 



Telephone Connection. 



Established 1826. 

Incorporated 1891. 



The 

SCHOOL AND 
** SENIOR CLASS 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

FOR 

LASELL SEMINARY, 

IS 

CHARLES V. HEARN, 

392 Boylston Street J- J- BOSTON. 



We should be pleased to receive a liberal patronage of Juniors as well as 
others at Lasell in addition to the customary work the Seniors have 
each year, and trust we may be so f.wored. Many new styles are in- 
troduced, the cabinet Platinums or Carbonette photograph being very 
attractive. Special prices are quoted all Lasell students. 



? 



This is a view of 
Queen Victoria's kitch- 
en, Windsor Castle, and 
shows how the roasts 
for royalty are prepared. 

The Lasell kitchen 
is far superior in this 
respect, having the 
benefit of a thoroughly 
modern outfit, installed 
by the Smith & An- 
thony Co., Kitchen 
Outfitters for the lead- 
ing New England In- 
stitutions and Hotels. 

The Kitchen should 
supplement the Table, 
and this is very hap- 
pily done at Lasell, 
where the Cooking Appliances are of the most improved type. We 
refer to Lasell as having one of our model kitchen plants. 

SniTH & Anthony Cohpany, 

Makers of Hotel and Institution Cooking Apparatus. 

52 and 54 UNION STREET, BOSTON. 




'ftOWenW 



Wfl. CAP5TICK, 



^FfcORIST, 



ASPEN AVENUE, 



AUBURN DALE. 



t£* «&** t2r* 



Wedding; Decorations and Funeral Emblems 
at shortest notice. 

ALSO 

BEDDING PLANTS, 
CUT ROSES AND CARNATIONS, 

A SPECIALTY. 



(<3o) 



WARD & CO. 



Carriage 
Painting and 
Repairing 



IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

ELM, cor. WASHINGTON STREET, 

Near City Hall, 

WEST NEWTON. 

Best Work at Lowest Prices. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



DEALER IN 



S$/*+. 



flay, Grain and feed, 



LEXINGTON STREET, 
AUBURNDALE. 



TELEPHONE. 



C F. EDDY CO. 



DEALERS IN 



COAL, 


WOOD, 




HAY, STRAW, 


FLOUR, 


GRAIN, 


FEED, 




LIME, CEMENT, DRAIN 


PIPE 


ETC. 





Washington St., near R. R. Crossing, 

WEST NEWTON. 



STICKNEY & SMITH, 

134 BOYLSTON STREET, 
Boston, Mass. 

+>«-^o^.i.- 
LADIES' AND HISSES' 






Cloaks, 
Suits, 
Waists and 
Furs. 




10% Discount allowed all College Students. 



(130 



Chandler Seaver, 

Portrait and 
Landscape Photographer, 



West Newton, Mass. 



5l?e ^offee u$ed at tl?is 5 < ? m >9 ar y is from t|?e 



Oriental J<?a <?o., 



. . B0S50K • • 



LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



FIRST-CLHSS 



Furniture *£ *£ ^t 



AND 



Interior ^ Decorations 



Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill 



BOSTON. 



Wm. H. Hull. 
Geo. B. Darrow. 



C. P. Dver. 

Horace W. Stjckney. 



SPRINGER 
BROTHERS, 



Seasonable Garments 
in Great Variety. 
Correct Styles. 
Reasonable Prices. 



l£ 



The Cloak 
Manufacturers, 



500 Washington, cor. Bedford St., 
BOSTON. 



*£ 



Fashionable Capes, 
Coats, Jackets, Silk Waists, 
Outing Suits, 
Laundered Waists, 
Fur Capes, etc. 



Headquarters for .... 
FASHIONABLE CLOAKS and 
LADIES' OUTSIDE GARMENTS 

of Every Description. 



Discounts to Teachers and Students of all the Leading 
Educational Institutions, 



(132) 



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